Who Cares If They're Cute? This Zoologist Accepts Animals On Their Own Terms

Zoologist Lucy Cooke says humans have got it all wrong about sloths. "People think that because the animal is slow that it's somehow useless and redundant," she says. But in fact, "they are incredibly successful creatures." Cooke is the founder of the Sloth Appreciation Society and the author of a new book called The Truth About Animals: Stoned Sloths, Lovelorn Hippos, and Other Tales from the Wild Side of Wildlife. The book aims to set the record straight on some long-held misconceptions...

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WKNO Features

WKNO-TV

This week on WKNO's Behind the Headlines, our journalists' roundtable discussion digs into some current issues, including the controversy with Paint Memphis murals and questions about charter schools. Host Eric Barnes talks with Ryan Poe of the Commercial Appeal, Laura Faith Kebede of Chalkbeat Tennessee, Toby Sells of the Memphis Flyer and Bill Dries of the Memphis Daily News

Shirley Ann's Sweets

Valentine’s Day is tomorrow and if you are looking for a sweet treat for your Valentine, look no further.


This week on WKNO-TV's Behind the Headlines, Dr. Marjorie Hass, President of Rhodes College, discusses the impact of Rhodes on the city of Memphis and more. She is joined by host Eric Barnes and Bill Dries, senior reporter for the Memphis Daily News. 

Jennifer Chandler

Looking to score a touchdown at your Super Bowl party?

It's all about the snacks.

While nachos and sliders are popular game-day favorites, when it comes to quarterbacking the buffet, there's one dish on the must-have list: hot wings.


WKNO-TV

This week on WKNO's Behind the Headlines, Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell and Shelby County Health Department Director Dr. Alisa Haushalter discuss the county's efforts to deal with the opioid crisis.

The Kitchen Community

Did you know that a vegetable garden could impact a child in a positive way?


WKNO-TV

It's budget season and officials are discussing how the money will be spent. On WKNO's Behind the Headlines, Shelby County Commission Chair Heidi Shafer and Memphis City Council Chair Berlin Boyd talk about the budget and more this week. 

Women's March Anniversary Refreshes Activist Spirit

Jan 21, 2018
Savannah Smith, WKNO-FM

  More than 1,000 people gathered Saturday morning in Midtown Memphis for the second annual Women’s March, one of the many events held across the country last weekend.

 

Unlike last year’s march down Main Street, this year’s rally was held inside First Congregational Church.

During the event, activists and community leaders gave speeches stressing the importance of individuals voting and staying active in politics.

Kathy Story, who took part last year, spoke about the ever-changing political climate.

A local author has a new cookbook out with a twist like no other!


Dr. Susan Warner

One local physician has combined her love of cooking, her long-term interest in nutrition, and her medical knowledge to create a culinary medicine practice.


Pages

"I'm not a hero. I'm just a regular person," said James Shaw Jr., who police say saved lives by disarming a man who opened fire Sunday at a Waffle House in Tennessee. Shaw insists he acted only to save himself — but many others are calling him a hero for stopping the violence.

"I think anybody could've did what I did if they're just pushed in that kind of cage," Shaw said, "and you have to either react or you're going to, you know, fold."

Since long before anyone can remember, the big, fertile slopes of the Alazani Valley in eastern Georgia have been planted with grape vines. It's the heartland of wine-making in the country that invented it 8,000 years ago. But in recent months, the valley has been going through a new kind of ferment, because of bitcoin.

Long before it lands on a restaurant menu, Chilean sea bass takes quite a journey to arrive on land. To catch these deep-sea dwellers, fishers usually drag nets along the ocean floor a quarter of a mile, or more, beneath the ocean's surface — a form of fishing called bottom trawling.

The United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization tries to keep tabs on bottom trawling, which rakes in juvenile fish and lots of other ocean species that are not the desired catch, depleting future fish stocks. It asks member countries to adhere to quotas and report fishing statistics.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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TENNESSEE NEWS

Monument, Testing Controversies Rock Tennessee Lawmakers In Session's Final Days

The Tri-Star State — A Tennessee Politics Podcast — Week of April 22, 2018 The big debates appeared to be behind the Tennessee Legislature, which has been in a wrap-up phase for the last week or two. Then a move to "punish" Memphis and a cyberattack on standardized tests injected high drama into the final days of the session. In this week's edition of The Tri-Star State , WPLN'sJason Moon Wilkins and statehouse reporter Chas Sisk look at why a budget decision stirred a national debate on race and how lawmakers addressed more trouble with TNReady.

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ARKANSAS NEWS

March For Science Scheduled For Saturday In Little Rock

Hear the report by KUARs David Monteith. Advocates for using science and data to drive policy decisions plan to take their concerns to the steps of the Arkansas State Capitol Saturday. The second annual March for Science happened in many states, including the nation’s Capitol, a week ago on April 14. Arkansas Sierra Club Executive Director Glenn Hooks says each march relates to the environmental issues in that state. "Right here in Arkansas we’re looking at everything from chronic wasting...

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