News

WKNO-TV

This week on WKNO's Behind the Headlines, host Eric Barnes digs into next year's local and state elections with Lee Mills, chairman for the Republican Party of Shelby County and Corey Strong, Chairman for the Shelby County Democratic Party. Bill Dries, senior reporter for the Memphis Daily News, joins the discussion.

Photo by Royal Artist Group

Looking to add some new Memphis music to your playlist? Commercial Appeal music writer Bob Mehr joins us to talk about a few of his favorites for the year, based a recent "Best of" article. Listen to the interview, or just check out the videos below.


WKNO-TV

How does public art shape the civic landscape? This week on WKNO's Behind the Headlines, host Eric Barnes talks with Lauren Kennedy, executive director of the UrbanArt Commission and Karen Golightly, director of Paint Memphis. They are joined by Bill Dries, senior reporter for the Memphis Daily News.

Wine Market

No holiday soiree is complete without a good wine to enjoy.


Shotwell Candy Company

One of my favorite gifts to give … and receive … is a delicious treat made by hand. 


WKNO-TV

This week on WKNO's Behind the Headlines, Memphis City Council members Martavius Jones, Kemp Conrad, and Chairman Berlin Boyd discuss Beale Street, Confederate monuments, alcohol on Main Street, and more with Bill Dries of the Memphis Daily News, and Host Eric Barnes.

What Can I Bring?

Nov 28, 2017
What Can I Bring? by Elizabeth Heiskell

The holidays are here … and that means “Party Time!” 


Thanksgiving isn’t complete without cranberry sauce.


This week on WKNO's Behind the Headlines, panelists discuss the future of Overton Park and the Brooks Museum's decision to build a new home in Downtown Memphis. Host Eric Barnes is joined by Emily Ballew Neff, executive director of the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art; Tina Sullivan, Executive Director of Overton Park; Alan Crone, Senior Policy Advisor for the city of Memphis; and reporter Bill Dries of the Memphis Daily News. 

Christopher Blank - WKNO-FM

For 60 years, a small recording studio in South Memphis, near the corner of East Trigg and Willie Mitchell Boulevard, has survived changing music styles, economic ups and downs and generational shifts.

Royal Studios is now one of the oldest continuously-operating recording studios in the world.


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