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Book Reviews
12:05 pm
Thu January 17, 2013

How A 'Madwoman' Upended A Literary Boys Club

This week, the National Book Critics Circle announced that two feminist literary scholars, Sandra Gilbert and Susan Gubar, would be the recipients of its 2013 Lifetime Achievement Award.

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The Salt
11:23 am
Thu January 17, 2013

4 Tips To Help A Foodie Get Through Chemo

Some of the author's favorite foods, like yogurt, just didn't taste good during chemo.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon February 4, 2013 2:12 pm

When I was diagnosed with breast cancer two years ago, it was clear that I would be thinking about a lot of things — myriad doctor visits, multiple tests, surgeries and chemotherapy.

Here are some things I knew about chemotherapy going in: it is unpleasant; it poisons your body; it makes you nauseated.

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Music
11:13 am
Thu January 17, 2013

After Big Year, Emeli Sande's 'Version of Events'

Emeli Sande.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu January 17, 2013 9:35 pm

After huge critical and commercial success last year, breakthrough British sensation Emeli Sande has her sights set on America.

It's a long way from her roots. Born to a Zambian father and English mother, the singer-songwriter was raised in Scotland. She tells NPR's Michel Martin that being the only mixed-race family in a small village had a big impact on her.

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The Two-Way
11:07 am
Thu January 17, 2013

'Make Me Asian' App Removed From Google Play Store

A screenshot from the "Make me Asian" app page in the Google Play store. The app is no longer available.
Google Play

Originally published on Fri January 18, 2013 9:10 am

"Make Me Asian," a smartphone app that drew the ire of Asian-American activists for what they say are stereotypical depictions, is no longer available on the Google Play Store.

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Shots - Health News
10:55 am
Thu January 17, 2013

After Years Of Silence, The Plague Can Rise Again

There's no doubt that the plague has staying power.

The deadly bacterium has probably been infecting people for 20,000 years. And, its genes have hardly changed since it killed nearly half of Europe's population during The Black Death.

Now microbiologists have evidence that strains of the plague may be able to reactivate themselves and trigger new outbreaks — even after lying dormant for decades.

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