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2:18 pm
Sun October 28, 2012

Around The River Bend, A Flood Of History

The Ho-Chunk Indians still consider the river to be sacred, and it's easy to feel that calm, floating along the Bark.
Liam O'Leary

Originally published on Sun October 28, 2012 6:41 pm

The Bark River is my backyard, childhood river. And yet, in a lifetime of travel, I'd never explored it.

I knew it carved the land from the Ice Age to settlement times, from the Black Hawk War of 1832 (in which young Abraham Lincoln appears) to the era of grist mills. But the Bark also flows past impressive Indian mounds. It nurtured poets, naturalists and farmers.

When former Marquette University professor Milton Bates published his Bark River Chronicles through the Wisconsin State Historical Society, I jumped at the chance to learn about the river with him.

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
12:58 pm
Sun October 28, 2012

Hurricane CSI: Frankenstorm Sandy And Climate Change

Hurricane Sandy's huge cloud extends up to 2,000 miles based on a satellite image from Sunday.
NASA GOES Project

Originally published on Wed October 31, 2012 2:10 pm

It was not a good year for people, weather and climate. The winter was strangely warm in many places and the summer ridiculously hot. As a large fraction of the country suffered through extreme or even extraordinary drought many folks naturally wondered, "Is this climate change?" Then along came a presidential election in which the words "climate change" disappeared from the dialogue. Now, just a week or so before voting day, the convergence of westbound Hurricane Sandy with a eastbound cold front is creating a massive storm, a Frankenstorm even, that is threatening millions of Americans.

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Shots - Health News
12:32 pm
Sun October 28, 2012

Museum Teaches Anatomy And Disease With Ghoulish Body Part Bake-Off

STD cupcakes: From Two Little Cats Bakery in Cambridge & Hertfordshire, these chocolate cupcakes feature symptoms of sexually transmitted diseases, including gonorrhea, syphilis, genital warts, chlamydia and HIV.
Eat Your Heart Out 2012

Originally published on Wed October 31, 2012 10:16 am

Everyone's crazy for cupcakes these days, as our pals over at The Salt will tell you. So why not use them to lure the public into a conversation about STDs and platelets?

That's what St. Bartholomews Pathology Museum in the U.K. is up to this weekend, and the baked goods on the menu are quite the frightening sight.

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The Two-Way
12:17 pm
Sun October 28, 2012

East Coast Braces For Impact From Sandy

High winds blow sea foam onto Jennette's Pier in Nags Head, N.C., on Sunday, as wind and rain from Hurricane Sandy move into the area.
Gerry Broome AP

Originally published on Mon March 25, 2013 1:48 pm

"The time for preparing and talking is about over." That's the message from Craig Fugate, the head of the Federal Emergency Management Agency as Hurricane Sandy, the monstrous superstorm that's churning its way to the U.S. East Coast, threatening millions of people.

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History
8:46 am
Sun October 28, 2012

Closing Courthouse Brought Moonshiners To Justice

The John B. Hayes Federal Building in Wilkesboro, N.C., is among several federal courthouses being closed in the South.
Michael Tomsic WFAE

Originally published on Sun October 28, 2012 9:58 am

Moonshine used to be big business in the South, an illegal business that also kept the federal courthouses busy. Now one of those facilities, once on the front lines of the war on homemade booze, is shutting down.

The Johnson J. Hayes Federal Building is in Wilkesboro, N.C., where distilling corn whiskey in backwoods breweries was once the town's main trade. It's one of six federal courthouses closing in the South over the next year or two.

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