NPR News

Pages

Business
4:03 pm
Fri June 1, 2012

No Beer Goggles For Baseball Stadium Brew Prices

A fan of the St. Louis Cardinals buys a beer from a vendor prior to Game 3 of the World Series against the Detroit Tigers at Busch Stadium in 2006. At 56 cents an ounce, St. Louis is second only to Boston for the priciest ballpark brew in the country.
Jamie Squire Getty Images

Originally published on Fri June 1, 2012 5:13 pm

Change has been the story of the season for the Miami Marlins, formerly the Florida Marlins. With a new coach, a new name, new team colors and a new stadium the baseball team set a franchise record for winning games in May.

But one tradition isn't changing anytime soon: beer. Ordering a beer at a baseball game is as American as apple pie. So is forking over a small fortune for that beer.

According to an analysis by TheStreet.com, the most expensive beer of any baseball stadium is sold at the new Marlins Park, where baseball fans pay $8 for a Bud Light draft.

Read more
Shots - Health Blog
3:47 pm
Fri June 1, 2012

As Nations Develop, Cancer Takes Hold

No corner of the world is safe from cancer.
iStockphoto

Cancer is everywhere.

And, before long, cancer will be a major cause of death in every part of the world, not just a big factor in what's now the developed world.

In 2030 the world's population is expected to hit 8.3 billion, up from 7 billion today. By then, new cases of cancer cases are expected to nearly double to 20.3 million from 12.8 million in 2008, according to an analysis in The Lancet Oncology.

Read more
Law
3:29 pm
Fri June 1, 2012

Edwards Verdict: A Case Of Campaign Law Confusion

Former Sen. John Edwards leaves federal court in Greensboro, N.C., Thursday after jurors acquitted him of one felony count and a judge declared a mistrial on five other charges.
Sara D. Davis Getty Images

Originally published on Fri June 1, 2012 9:29 pm

From the day a grand jury indicted former Sen. John Edwards on six felony charges nearly one year ago, the case drew jeers from election lawyers and government watchdogs.

"It was an incredibly aggressive prosecution because it was based on a novel theory of the law," says Melanie Sloan, executive director of Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington. "There was literally no precedent. No case had ever been like this."

Read more
The Two-Way
3:15 pm
Fri June 1, 2012

As The Worm Turns: Cybersecurity Expert Tracks Blowback From Stuxnet

Iran's Bushehr nuclear power plant, shown in this International Iran Photo Agency image from August 2010, was infected by the Stuxnet computer worm — which reportedly was created in the United States.
Ebrahim Norouzi AP

The CIA has a term called "blowback" to describe when an operation against the enemy has unintended negative consequences for the U.S. or its allies. In the age of cyberwarfare, blowback seems to be a paramount concern.

Read more
The Two-Way
3:01 pm
Fri June 1, 2012

Facebook Will Allow Users To Vote On Privacy Changes

Facebook's logo.
Emmanuel Dunand AFP/Getty Images

Facebook will ask its nearly 1 billion users to vote up or down on changes to its privacy policy.

According to a statement released by the social network, the company also put changes up for a vote in 2009. Voting begins today and goes through June 8.

"If more than 30 percent of all active registered users vote, the results will be binding," Facebook said. "If turnout is less than 30 percent, the vote will be advisory."

Read more

Pages