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The Two-Way
11:19 am
Mon May 14, 2012

FAMU Band Will Remain Suspended Another Year

Florida A&M Marching 100 Drum Major Robert Champion during a performance at halftime of the game against Howard University at Bragg Memorial Stadium on Oct. 8, 2011 in Tallahassee, Florida.
Don Juan Moore AP

The president of Florida A&M University said his school's Marching 100 band — which has been marred by a hazing scandal — will remain suspended through the 2012-2013 school year.

The Orlando Sentinel reports James Ammons informed the board of his decision during a teleconference today. The Sentinel adds:

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The Fracking Boom: Missing Answers
11:10 am
Mon May 14, 2012

With Gas Boom, Pennsylvania Fears New Toxic Legacy

NPR

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 9:55 am

In Pennsylvania, there's an industrial revolution going on. Battalions of drilling rigs are boring into the earth to extract natural gas from an underground layer of shale called the Marcellus formation.

And as the wells multiply all along the western end of the state, people worry they may be facing another toxic legacy.

The first one came from coal mining. All over the state, you can see bright orange rivers and streams. The aquatic life was killed by acidic runoff from abandoned mines.

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Behind Closed Doors
11:03 am
Mon May 14, 2012

Is There A Better Way To Talk About Obesity?

A recent study projects that more than 40 percent of Americans will be obese by the year 2030. Host Michel Martin delves into the cultural factors that might be preventing African-Americans and Latinos from losing weight. Martin speaks with Jane Delgado of the National Alliance for Hispanic Health, and Jenee Desmond-Harris of The Root.

Economy
10:53 am
Mon May 14, 2012

Uneven Economy Evens The Field For Obama, Romney

An audience member decries President Obama's economic policies as Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney speaks during a February campaign rally in Atlanta.
Gerald Herbert AP

Originally published on Mon May 14, 2012 12:51 pm

As the election year began, conventional wisdom was pretty well set about the outcome of the presidential race. If the economy improved, President Obama would win. If not, he'd be a one-termer.

So what does it mean that many big economic indicators are moving sideways?

"Obama seems to be in that gray area," says Paul Pierson, a political scientist at the University of California, Berkeley. "The numbers are neither so good nor so bad that they give you a definitive answer."

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NPR Story
10:49 am
Mon May 14, 2012

In Mexico, Cartels Target Journalists

The spiraling drug violence is increasingly affecting journalists, in a country considered one of the most dangerous for reporters. Host Michel Martin speaks with Jose de Cordoba of The Wall Street Journal, and Carlos Lauria of the Committee to Protect Journalists. Advisory: This segment may not be comfortable for some listeners.

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