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It's All Politics
11:30 am
Fri July 20, 2012

Movie-Theater Shootings Put Presidential Politics On Hold

President Obama turned a planned campaign speech in Fort Myers, Fla., into a brief statement about the shooting rampage. He asked the audience to join him in a moment of silence for the victims.
Mandel Ngan AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri July 20, 2012 5:56 pm

(Updated @ 1:11 pm ET)

As deeply as the mass shootings in Aurora, Colo., shocked the national conscience, they also quickly affected the U.S. political scene, with both major party presidential campaigns ripping up their scripts for Friday, and the mayor of the nation's largest city using the issue to put the candidates on the spot on gun control.

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BackTalk
11:20 am
Fri July 20, 2012

Casinos A Health Benefit For Seniors?

Tell Me More host Michel Martin and editor Ammad Omar dig through the listener feedback in Backtalk. This week they mark the end of "Linsanity" for fans of the New York Knicks, and the American Gaming Association weighs in on a story about casinos.

Barbershop
11:20 am
Fri July 20, 2012

Did Darkness Of Movie Edge On Colo. Shooter?

This week in the Barbershop, the guys talk about the latest Batman movie, The Dark Knight Rises. A gunman opened fire in a Colorado theater in which the film was being shown. Host Michel Martin checks in with writer Jimi Izrael; civil rights attorney Arsalan Iftikhar; columnist Jeff Yang and film critic Wesley Morris.

Faith Matters
11:20 am
Fri July 20, 2012

Missionaries In Africa Doing More Harm Than Good?

Christian missionaries devote time, energy and billions of dollars to helping African children orphaned by the AIDS epidemic. But sometimes well-meaning efforts can do more harm than good. In this week's Faith Matters conversation, host Michel Martin speaks to writer and journalist John Donnelly about his new book, A Twist of Faith: An American Christian's Quest to Help Orphans in Africa.

Faith Matters
11:20 am
Fri July 20, 2012

The Mosaic Of Asian-American Worship

Asian-Americans are a rapidly growing population in the United States, and a new report finds the majority are not Christian. According to the Pew Research Center, half of Asian-Americans are either Hindu, Buddhist, or not affiliated with any religion. Continuing Tell Me More's conversation on faith, host Michel Martin speaks with Pew senior researcher Cary Funk about some of the surprising statistics she found in the study.

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