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Planet Money
3:01 pm
Tue May 15, 2012

Is Facebook Worth $100 Billion?

Paul Sakuma AP

Originally published on Thu May 17, 2012 11:56 am

When Facebook goes public this week, the company will be valued at roughly $100 billion.

It will be the highest valuation ever for an initial public offering of a tech company. Is Facebook really worth this much money?

One way to frame the question is to consider a single fraction.

The number on top of the fraction is the total value of the company. The number on the bottom is the company's profits over the past year. This fraction is called the price-to-earnings ratio. It's widely used by investors in stocks.

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The Two-Way
2:53 pm
Tue May 15, 2012

Carlos Fuentes, Legendary Mexican Writer, Dies

Mexican writer Carlos Fuentes takes part in a tribute to Mexican writer and anthropologist Fernando Benitez in December 2011.
Alfredo Estrella AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue May 15, 2012 4:36 pm

Carlos Fuentes, one of the most prolific and best known Spanish-language authors, has died. His death was reported on Twitter by Mexican president Felipe Calderon. The Mexican daily Reforma, which Fuentes often wrote for, reports the author died after experiencing heart problems.

He was 83.

"I am profoundly sorry for the death our loved and admired Carlos Fuentes, writer and universal Mexican. Rest in peace," Calderon wrote on Twitter.

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Shots - Health Blog
2:49 pm
Tue May 15, 2012

You May Be Among The Things That Go Bump In The Night

She's not alone.
iStockphoto.com

To be perfectly honest, I'm not sure I've ever walked in my sleep. There's a family story that I'd like to label fiction about a somnolent bathroom run that ended in a closet. But if it ever happened, I don't remember it.

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The Fracking Boom: Missing Answers
2:33 pm
Tue May 15, 2012

'Close Encounters' With Gas Well Pollution

NPR

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 9:54 am

Living in the middle of a natural gas boom can be pretty unsettling. The area around the town of Silt, Colo., used to be the kind of sleepy rural place where the tweet of birds was the most you would hear. Now it's hard to make out the birds because of the rumbling of natural gas drilling rigs.

The land here is steep cliffs and valleys. But bare splotches of earth called well pads are all over the place.

"That's the one I'm worried about because it just went in," says Tim Ray.

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National Security
2:30 pm
Tue May 15, 2012

Why Do Terrorists So Often Go For Planes?

Despite the multiple layers of security at airports, terrorists still often target planes. But terrorism analysts say they are also concerned about soft targets. Here, a Transportation Security Administration agent looks at an identity card at the Portland International Airport earlier this month.
Rick Bowmer AP

Originally published on Tue May 15, 2012 3:22 pm

Ever since the Sept. 11 attacks, airports have probably been the most heavily guarded sites when it comes to preventing terrorist attacks.

And yet the most recent terrorism plot in Yemen involved an attempt to blow up a U.S. airliner with a bomber wearing a difficult-to-detect explosive bomb in his underwear, according to U.S. officials.

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