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Sports
1:34 pm
Fri May 11, 2012

Hikaru Nakamura, The Next Bobby Fischer?

Chess Club and Scholastic Center of St. Louis

Originally published on Fri May 11, 2012 4:32 pm

At the U.S. Chess Championships under way in St. Louis, all eyes are on America's top-ranked player, and the favorite going into the tournament, Hikaru Nakamura.

During the past decade, Nakamura has made a name for himself as the new superstar of American chess, and with it, he's become a kind of spokesperson for a game that hasn't been too popular in this country since the days of world champion Bobby Fischer.

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Environment
12:50 pm
Fri May 11, 2012

'The Garbage-Men' Rock A Trashy Sound

The Garbage-Men is a band of high school-aged musicians who play instruments made out of recycled cereal boxes, buckets, and other materials they've rescued from the trash. Guitarist Jack Berry and drummer Ollie Gray talk about the band and their signature "trashy" sound.

Technology
12:36 pm
Fri May 11, 2012

Disguising Secret Messages, In A Game Of Spy Vs Spy

Last May, German investigators found secret files embedded in a pornographic video on memory cards being carried by a suspected al Qaeda operative. Peter Wayner describes the history and technology of the technique for hiding information, known as steganography.

'It's All Politics': NPR's Weekly News Roundup
12:35 pm
Fri May 11, 2012

It's All Politics, May 10, 2012

KRISTOPHER SKINNER MCT /Landov

Gay marriage gets an advocate in the White House, but only after Vice President Joe Biden has his say. President Obama's announcement comes a day after North Carolina voters overwhelmingly rejected the concept. And Dick Lugar's 36-year Senate career comes to an end in Indiana. Meanwhile, in the West Virginia primary, Obama defeats a jailed felon from Texas, 59 percent to 41 percent.

Listen to the latest political roundup with NPR's Ken Rudin and Ron Elving.

Politics
12:29 pm
Fri May 11, 2012

The Case For A Presidential Science Debate

A group of science advocates say the American president should have the basic scientific know-how to understand policy challenges, evaluate options and devise solutions. Ira Flatow and guests discuss how a presidential science debate can help voters decide if a candidate is up for the job.

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