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Faith Matters
11:00 am
Fri February 10, 2012

Mixed Reactions To First Native American Saint

The Vatican recently announced that the 17th-century Mohawk woman, Kateri Tekakwitha, will be canonized as a Catholic saint. Many Native Americans say this is an honor, but others feel it legitimizes the abuses of colonialism. Host Michel Martin speaks with reporter Brian Bull, chair of the group, Native American Public Telecommunications.

Race
11:00 am
Fri February 10, 2012

The High Price Of Being A Black Atheist

A group of African American humanists is running an ad campaign during February. It features historical figures, including Frederick Douglass and Langston Hughes, who they believe shared humanist values. Alix Jules is part of the campaign and he speaks with host Michel Martin about his experience as a black atheist.

Barbershop
11:00 am
Fri February 10, 2012

Shop Talk: CNN Tangles With Controversy

Originally published on Fri February 10, 2012 11:43 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Now it's time for our weekly to the Barbershop where the guys talk about what's in the news and what's on their minds.

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BackTalk
11:00 am
Fri February 10, 2012

'Linsanity' Taking Knicks, NBA By Storm

Originally published on Fri February 10, 2012 11:43 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

And now it's time for BackTalk. That's where we lift the curtain on what's happening in the TELL ME MORE blogosphere. Editor Ammad Omar is here with us once again.

Ammad, what do you have for us today?

AMMAD OMAR, BYLINE: All right, Michel. We're going to start with a women's health topic that's been in the news and we covered in our political chat on Wednesday. We talked about that decision by the Susan G. Komen for the Cure Foundation to strip funding from Planned Parenthood and why they eventually reversed that decision.

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Shots - Health Blog
10:49 am
Fri February 10, 2012

White House Bends On Birth Control Requirement For Religious Groups

Originally published on Fri February 10, 2012 11:30 am

Under increasing pressure, the White House has offered what it's calling an "accommodation" to religious groups on a requirement to cover birth control free of charge.

Even some Democrats, who generally support the policy of requiring most employers to offer no-cost contraception, were unhappy with the rule's reach.

But the change unveiled by the White House isn't expected to completely quell the uproar raised by Catholics and others who say the policy violates their freedom of religion.

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