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Iraq
12:00 pm
Tue February 7, 2012

How Should We Welcome Home Iraq War Veterans?

St. Louis, Mo. held a parade for veterans of the Iraq War in January 2012 that drew an estimated 20,000 participants and 100,000 spectators. Fifteen other cities are considering similar parades, but some argue that such celebrations should not be held while the war in Afghanistan continues.

Around the Nation
12:00 pm
Tue February 7, 2012

Correcting Common Misconceptions About Air Travel

The claims airline passengers make about flights are often embellished. During turbulence, for example, passengers may think a plane is dropping hundreds of feet, when it's never typically more than 20. Airline pilot Patrick Smith, writes the Ask The Pilot column for Salon.com. He sets the record straight on common air travel myths.

The Two-Way
11:45 am
Tue February 7, 2012

Ticker-Tape Sure Sounds Better Than 'Recycled Unprinted Newspaper' Parade

As the paper falls, New York Giants fans cheer during today's parade in Manhattan.
John Minchillo AP

Originally published on Tue February 7, 2012 12:59 pm

Ah, the ticker-tape parade.

A celebration of heroes. A welcome home for champions. An outpouring of joy.

And since the late '60s, a ticker-tapeless affair.

As the NFL champion New York Giants parade Broadway's Canyon of Heroes today in the 200th-or-so "ticker-tape parade," let's take a moment to consider just what is floating down from buildings above.

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NPR Story
11:00 am
Tue February 7, 2012

Syrian President Going Down Amid Uproar?

The U.S. faces rising tensions across the Middle East and North Africa. The U.S. Embassy in Syria recently closed as violence against dissidents continued. In Egypt, a group of Americans, including a cabinet secretary's son, is facing trial for funding pro-democracy groups. Host Michel Martin checks in with Hisham Melhem of Al-Aribiya television.

NPR Story
11:00 am
Tue February 7, 2012

Sketchy Labor Practices Sour Apple Consumers

Reports have recently surfaced about poor working conditions in Chinese factories that help make consumer electronic products. The companies are accused of exposing workers to toxins, hiring the underage, and improperly disposing waste. Host Michel Martin talks with C-NET Editor Rafe Needleman about these findings.

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