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History
11:19 am
Thu February 9, 2012

Historian Seeks Artifacts From Lincoln's Last Days

This drawing of Abraham Lincoln by editorial cartoonist Thomas Nast was published in Harper's Magazine in 1865.
Courtesy Harper's Magazine

Historian Noah Andre Trudeau is known for uncovering secrets of the Civil War. His previous books, Bloody Roads South and Gettysburg, have unveiled information about Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman's march to the sea in 1864, and the legacy of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee. Now, in preparation for a book about a largely unexamined period of President Abraham Lincoln's life, Trudeau is in search of witnesses.

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Movie Reviews
11:11 am
Thu February 9, 2012

'Safe House,' 'Haywire': Watch Them Back To Back

Mixed martial arts fighter Gina Carano stars as Mallory Kane, a highly trained covert operative, in a twisty, tautly wrought thriller.
Claudette Barius Relativity Media

Originally published on Fri February 10, 2012 11:19 am

The flashy Denzel Washington thriller Safe House will probably gross in a few hours what Steven Soderbergh's Haywire has made in several weeks, but if you like action you ought to catch both back to back. Soderbergh's film is a reaction to the jangled, high-impact style of Safe House and its ilk.

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NPR Story
11:00 am
Thu February 9, 2012

Conservatives Hope To Reach Hard-Pressed Youth

Young conservatives are bringing new energy to this year's Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) with a panel called, "Why Am I Living in My Parent's Basement?" Host Michel Martin talks with two young people attending, about how they hope to bring under-30 voters to their side of the aisle.

NPR Story
11:00 am
Thu February 9, 2012

'We Are Still Awake,' Says Egyptian Protester

It's been nearly one year since Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak stepped down, and the country is still experiencing the growing pains of transition. Last year, host Michel Martin spoke with a young protester minutes after Mubarak's resignation. Now, Martin catches up with her again to see if she's still optimistic about changes in her country.

NPR Story
11:00 am
Thu February 9, 2012

Behind The Glamour, GRAMMY Controversy Brewing

During this Sunday's GRAMMY Awards, genres such as Native American, Hawaiian and Cajun music are merged into one category. The decision has caused some backlash with charges of racism and exclusion. Host Michel Martin discusses the decision with Felix Contreras, a reporter for NPR's Arts Desk and co-host of NPR Music's Alt.Latino podcast.

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