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3:41 pm
Mon April 23, 2012

Letters: Two Writers And Looking At Movie Quotes

Originally published on Mon April 23, 2012 6:39 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

It's time now for Your Letters. On Friday, we told you about two writers who. on the surface, couldn't have been more different. Asa Carter, a member of the Ku Klux Klan, was a speechwriter for Alabama Governor George Wallace. He penned Wallace's now famous 1963 inaugural address.

GOVERNOR GEORGE WALLACE: And I say segregation now, segregation tomorrow and segregation forever.

(SOUNDBITE OF CHEERING AND APPLAUSE)

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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History
3:20 pm
Mon April 23, 2012

Discovery Sparks Interest In Forgotten Black Scholar

Three years ago, Rufus McDonald found historic documents in an abandoned house and took them to a rare-books dealer. The papers and books belonged to Richard T. Greener, a 19th century intellectual who was the first African-American to graduate from Harvard University.
Cheryl Corley NPR

Originally published on Mon April 23, 2012 6:39 pm

Three years ago, just moments before sledgehammers ripped through an abandoned home in Chicago, the head of a demolition crew decided to save the contents of an old steamer trunk stored in the attic.

"They were about to demolish it because they couldn't get it down the stairs," says Rufus McDonald, who gathered what was inside the steamer trunk — documents and old books — and took them to a rare-book dealer in Chicago.

"He said, 'Do you know who this is?' I said, 'Nah, who is it?' He said, 'It's Richard Theodore Greener," McDonald recalls. "I said, 'Who is he?' "

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Shots - Health Blog
3:18 pm
Mon April 23, 2012

Cancer Doc Brawley Says The U.S. Health Care System Is Sick

Otis Brawley, M.D., chief medical officer of the American Cancer Society.
Chris Hamilton American Cancer Society

Originally published on Fri April 27, 2012 8:48 am

Journalists make for a pretty tough crowd.

But Dr. Otis Brawley, chief medical officer for the American Cancer Society, fired up hundreds of them at the annual meeting of Association of Health Care Journalists over the weekend with a no-holds-barred critique of the U.S. health system.

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The Salt
3:01 pm
Mon April 23, 2012

Are Local Salad Greens Safer Than Packaged Salad Greens?

Miller Farms in Maryland is a family-run operation that sells its home-grown vegetables at farmers' markets and local grocery stores. Phil Miller, whose family owns the farm, says he's trying to earn a food safety certification now required by many food buyers.
Maggie Starbard NPR

Originally published on Tue April 24, 2012 6:23 am

There were lots of comments on this blog regarding my recent stories about making salads safer. Many of those comments argued that the solution is to grow your own. Or at least buy from local farmers.

Which raises an interesting question: Are salad greens from your local farmer's market actually safer than packaged lettuce from thousands of miles away? And should the same safety rules apply to both?

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The Picture Show
2:17 pm
Mon April 23, 2012

Are Your Facebook Friends Really Your Friends?

Photographer Tanja Hollander is on a mission to make protraits of all of her Facebook friends.
Tanja Hollander

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 9:51 am

The new issue of The Atlantic asks: Is Facebook Making Us Lonely? The jury's out, though signs point to maybe.

Facebook didn't necessarily make Tanja Hollander lonely, per se, but it did make her curious. It was a little over two years ago when she looked at that number representing "friends," 626 in her case, and started to analyze it.

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