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BackTalk
11:00 am
Fri January 20, 2012

Listeners Nominate Changes To Election Day

Tell Me More editor Ammad Omar and host Michel Martin comb recent listener feedback. More than 900 responses poured in for a recent conversation about pushing election day to the weekend. They also hear responses to an interview with the comedian who made the YouTube viral video about stuff 'white girls say.'

Barbershop
11:00 am
Fri January 20, 2012

Shop Talk: Gingrich's Moral Fiber, Men's Obesity

The guys discuss Marianne Gingrich's comment that her ex-husband Newt is not morally fit to be president. They also weigh in funding issues with Red Tails, and new data showing that men are catching up to women when it comes to obesity rates. Host Michel Martin hears from Jimi Izrael, Arsalan Ifthikar, Kevin Williamson and Dave Zirin.

Presidential Race
11:00 am
Fri January 20, 2012

High Stakes In South Carolina Primary

Originally published on Fri January 20, 2012 4:37 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Coming up, we will go to Mississippi, where a real firestorm is brewing over the more than 200 pardons former Governor Haley Barbour granted before he left office earlier this month. Now the state's attorney general is heading to court to try to void some of those. We'll talk with a reporter who's been covering this story in just a few minutes. But first we want to check in on national politics.

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Law
11:00 am
Fri January 20, 2012

Why The Public Outcry Over Mississippi Pardons?

Former Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour says faith guided his decision to pardon more than 200 convicted criminals before he left office. Now the state's attorney general is seeking a court order to void some of those pardons. Host Michel Martin talks with Clarion-Ledger Reporter Jessica Bakeman about the pending legal challenge.

Planet Money
10:55 am
Fri January 20, 2012

The Secret Document That Transformed China

Yen Jingchang was one of the signers of the secret document.
Jacob Goldstein NPR

Originally published on Fri January 20, 2012 8:03 pm

In 1978, the farmers in a small Chinese village called Xiaogang gathered in a mud hut to sign a secret contract. They thought it might get them executed. Instead, it wound up transforming China's economy in ways that are still reverberating today.

The contract was so risky — and such a big deal — because it was created at the height of communism in China. Everyone worked on the village's collective farm; there was no personal property.

"Back then, even one straw belonged to the group," says Yen Jingchang, who was a farmer in Xiaogang in 1978. "No one owned anything."

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