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Music
11:00 am
Mon December 26, 2011

Music in 2011 Rocked, What About 2012?

If you're reminiscing over all of the great albums released in 2011, keep in mind, there's plenty to look forward to next year. Guest host Allison Keyes finds out what to keep an ear out for. She talks with two of the biggest music fans on the Tell Me More team: freelance producer, Veronica Miller, and Sarah Ventre, a freelance music journalist.

Economy
11:00 am
Mon December 26, 2011

Food Banks See Drop In Donations

Nearly 50 Americans million now live below the poverty line, according to the Census Bureau. Many food banks are not only reporting an increase in the number of people they're serving, but also a drop in food and cash donations — as much as 30 percent in some areas. Guest host Allison Keyes talks with two people working on the front lines of hunger relief.

Children's Health
11:00 am
Mon December 26, 2011

What If Your Child Says, I'm In The Wrong Body?

Dr. Norman Spack at Boston's Children's Hospital has worked with 30 transgender youth and their families to get through the difficult phases of adolescence. One treatment includes a controversial medication that blocks puberty until he or she decides whether or not to transition to the other gender. Dr. Spack talks with guest host Allison Keyes.

The Record
11:00 am
Mon December 26, 2011

Skylar Grey: And The Hits Keep Coming

Skylar Grey.
P.R. Brown Courtesy of Universal Music Group

Originally published on Tue December 27, 2011 1:41 pm

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Technology
10:38 am
Mon December 26, 2011

Timeline: A History Of Touch-Screen Technology

The University of Illinois released its PLATO IV touch-screen terminal in 1972.
Courtesy of the University of Illinois Archives

Originally published on Mon December 26, 2011 9:15 pm

1948 The Electronic Sackbut
The history of touch technology begins with touch-sensitive music synthesizers. According to the Canada Science and Technology Museum, Hugh Le Caine's Electronic Sackbut, completed in 1948, is widely considered to be the first musical synthesizer. The Sackbut is played with the right hand on the keyboard and the left hand on control board above the keyboard. The right hand controls volume by applying more or less pressure on the keys, while the left hand controls four different sound texture options.

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