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History
8:22 am
Sat March 17, 2012

Convicted Nazi Guard John Demjanjuk Dies

John Demjanjuk emerges from the courtroom with his lawyers after a judge sentenced him to five years in prison for charges related to 28,060 counts of accessory to murder in May 2011 in Munich, Germany.
Johannes Simon Getty Images

John Demjanjuk, the retired U.S. autoworker convicted of being a guard at in an infamous Nazi death camp, died Saturday at the age of 91. Demjanjuk died a free man in a nursing home in southern Germany, where he had been released pending his appeal.

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Politics
7:00 am
Sat March 17, 2012

Who Will Rule In Congress? A Look At The Races

Originally published on Sun March 18, 2012 9:07 am

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JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

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Media
7:00 am
Sat March 17, 2012

'This American Life' Pulls Apple Story

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, BYLINE: This weekend, the public radio program "This American Life" will air a retraction and apologize to listeners for a segment that aired in January about factories in China which make the Apple iPad. The story described hazardous working conditions at the plant. It was told by a man named Mike Daisey, who claimed to have interviewed workers injured there. Many elements of Daisey's story have now been discredited.

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Economy
7:00 am
Sat March 17, 2012

Markets Hit Milestones; Goldman Sachs Gets Bashed

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Jacki Lyden. Checking on your retirement and mutual fund statements is getting a bit less scary. The stock market cleared another hurdle this week with the S&P 500 closing above 1,400 for the first time in almost four years, and the Dow Jones Industrials up almost 25 percent from in recent low back in early October. NPR's John Ydstie is here to tell us what's driving the market. John, thank you for coming in.

JOHN YDSTIE, BYLINE: You're welcome, Jacki.

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Europe
7:00 am
Sat March 17, 2012

London Starts Digging Massive Tunnels For Transport

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

The history of the city of London dates back to the Romans and beyond. So, when you start digging massive tunnels beneath that place, it's always going to be interesting. And that's just what's about to happen.

MAYOR BORIS JOHNSON: I hereby declare Ada and Phyllis unleashed.

(SOUNDBITE OF BUZZER)

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