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Energy
3:00 am
Mon November 21, 2011

Seaway Pipeline Tweak Could Change Oil Market

Originally published on Mon November 21, 2011 6:06 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Linda Wertheimer.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning.

There's a little-known oil pipeline that snakes 500 miles from Oklahoma all the way down to the Gulf of Mexico. And while most people have probably never heard of the Seaway Pipeline, a tweak to the line's operations could lead to big changes in the oil market. Reporter Dan Gorenstein has more.

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Africa
3:00 am
Mon November 21, 2011

Egyptian Police, Protesters Clash For 3rd Day

Originally published on Mon November 21, 2011 5:50 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Linda Wertheimer.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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Europe
3:00 am
Mon November 21, 2011

'Boring' Rajoy Picked To Save Spain From Default

Originally published on Mon November 21, 2011 5:50 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Spain is the latest country to change its government over Europe's economic crisis. In a parliamentary election yesterday, Spaniards voted overwhelmingly to toss out the socialists who have ruled for almost eight years. They brought in Mariano Rajoy, leader of the conservative Popular Party.

(SOUNDBITE OF CHEERING)

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Business
3:00 am
Mon November 21, 2011

Business News

Linda Wertheimer has business news.

Environment
11:01 pm
Sun November 20, 2011

Boston's Leaky Gas Lines May Be Tough On The Trees

Nathan Phillips looks at methane data plotted on a map of Boston streets on Nov. 17. Data from a mobile methane "sniffer" and a GPS show a real-time display of the gas levels in Google Earth. The orange spike in the center of the screen, on St. Paul Street, indicates methane levels about two or three times above normal levels, Phillips says.
Robin Lubbock WBUR

A scientist in Boston has been driving around the city measuring leaks in the gas mains. He's found a lot, and he wants the public to know where they are.

Gas leaks aren't uncommon, and gas companies spend a lot of time tracking them down and repairing them. But the scientific team says they're surprised at how many they've found, and what those leaks are doing to the health of the city's trees.

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