Bill Chappell

Bill Chappell is a writer and producer on the Newsdesk, in the heart of NPR's newsroom in Washington, D.C.

Chappell's work at NPR has ranged from being the site's first full-time homepage editor to being the lead writer and editor for online coverage of several Olympic Games, from London 2012 to Pyeongchang 2018. His assignments have included being the lead web producer for NPR's trip to Asia's Grand Trunk Road, as well as establishing the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps on

In the past, Chappell has edited and coordinated digital features for Morning Edition and Fresh Air, in addition to editing the rundown of All Things Considered. He frequently contributes to other NPR blogs, such as All Tech Considered and The Salt.

In 2009, Chappell was a key editorial member of the small team that redesigned NPR's web site. One year later, won its first Peabody Award, along with the National Press Foundation's Excellence in Online Journalism award.

At NPR, Chappell has trained both digital and radio staff to use digital tools to tell compelling stories, in addition to "evangelizing" — promoting more collaboration between legacy and digital departments.

Prior to joining NPR, Chappell was part of the Assignment Desk at CNN International, handling coverage in areas from the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America, and coordinating CNN's pool coverage on major events.

Chappell's work for CNN included editing digital video and producing web stories for He also edited and produced stories for's features division.

Before joining CNN, Chappell wrote about movies, restaurants and music for alternative weeklies, in addition to his first job: editing the police blotter.

A holder of bachelor's degrees in English and History from the University of Georgia, Chappell attended graduate school for English Literature at the University of South Carolina.

We expected the cold. It was, after all, the Winter Olympics.

But the wind is what has made an impression on many of us visiting Pyeongchang. It's even caused competition schedules to be rewritten.

For a string of days last week, the wind blew steady at 15 to 20 mph, with gusts of 45 mph. Concession stands and security scanners were toppled; temporary tents were blown away.

On the worst day, it looked as if a massive dust storm had descended. Three days later, we were still shaking sand out of our boots.

The Court of Arbitration for Sport has confirmed that it has begun proceedings against Russian curler Aleksandr Krushelnitckii, who won a bronze medal in curling as part of the Olympic Athletes from Russia team at the Pyeongchang Winter Olympics.

Krushelnitckii finished third in the mixed-doubles curling tournament, competing with his wife and teammate, Anastasia Bryzgalova.

Updated at 9:45 a.m. ET

The U.S. women's ice hockey team dismantled Finland in their semifinals matchup at the Pyeongchang Winter Olympics on Monday, scoring goals early and often and claiming a spot in the gold medal game, where they will face Canada.

The U.S. team scored two goals in each of the first two periods; a pair of scores came in less than one minute in the second period.

He's emerged as a fan favorite, an athlete whose talent and personality shine through his skating — and whose sense of humor and humanity have been amplified by the Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang. But Adam Rippon says he's not ready to move from the Olympic Athlete's Village and join NBC.

News that the TV network had offered Rippon a job emerged on Sunday here at the Pyeongchang Games. But one day later, Rippon says he was glad to be asked — but that he still has work to do, cheering for his teammates.

She went up the hill a snowboarder but came down an Olympic champion skier. That's one way to tell the story of Ester Ledecka, the Czech athlete who stunned the world — and herself — by winning the women's Super-G race at the Pyeongchang Winter Olympics.

"How did that happen?" she asked a cameraman at the bottom of her run.

Nathan Chen rewrote the story of his Pyeongchang Winter Olympics, performing an unprecedented six quad jumps in his free skate and launching himself from 17th place and nearly winning a medal in the men's singles competition.

Japan's Yuzuru Hanyu repeated as the Olympic gold medalist in this event, on the strength of two riveting performances. Hanyu's teammate Shoma Uno won silver, and Spain's Javier Fernandez won bronze at the Gangneung Ice Arena in South Korea.

Mikaela Shiffrin overcame both delays and some of the best skiers in the world to claim her first gold medal at the 2018 Winter Olympics, winning the giant slalom. The weather finally cooperated, with sunny, clear skies over the Yongpyong Alpine Center in Pyeongchang.

Norway's Ragnhild Mowinckel won silver, 0.39 behind Shiffrin's combined time of 2:20.02.

Erin Hamlin was shut out from the podium in the women's singles luge at the Pyeongchang Winter Olympics on Tuesday, as Germany went 1-2 and Canada took the bronze.

Hamlin, who in 2014 became the first American to win an Olympic medal in singles luge (winning bronze) finished with a combined time that was 0.680 behind the winner, Natalie Geisenberger, over four runs down the track at Alpensia's Olympic Sliding Center in South Korea.

It's the second consecutive gold for Geisenberger, who also won in Sochi. Her cumulative time was 3:05.232.

U.S. figure skaters won the bronze medal in the team event on Monday, in an action-packed tournament that saw Mirai Nagasu land a historic jump – and in which Adam Rippon and other Americans showed they're in fine form at the Pyeongchang Winter Olympics.

"This is literally a dream come true for all of us," Nagasu said, in comments transcribed by the Olympics news service. "I think I speak on behalf of the team. We're super excited and we're at a loss for words. I'm really proud of my team."

U.S. snowboarder Jamie Anderson won the women's snowboard slopestyle competition at the Winter Olympics in South Korea on Monday, successfully defending the gold medal she won at the Sochi Olympics in 2014.

Anderson won after high winds delayed the competition at Phoenix Snow Park — and the conditions almost wrecked her medal-winning performance.