Blake Farmer

More black churches in the Nashville area are participating in the annual Day of Unity this weekend, in which they agree to address HIV prevention from the pulpit. But many pastors sidestep the issue of gay relationships.

Tennessee's senators were complimentary of President Trump's pick for the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday night, but they withheld explicit support.

Republican Sens. Lamar Alexander and Bob Corker issued statements soon after the announcement.

Tennessee's Medicaid program is trying to make it easier for patients to get prescription drugs that help treat opioid addiction. The moves come after years of restricting access to the medication because of concerns about abuse and diversion.

Vicki Bartholomew started a support group for wives who are caring for a husband with Alzheimer's disease because she needed that sort of group herself.

They meet every month in a conference room at a new memory care facility in Nashville, Tenn., called Abe's Garden, where Bartholomew's husband was one of the first residents — a Vietnam veteran and prominent attorney in Nashville.

A drug that has been increasingly abused by opioid users is becoming harder to access in Tennessee, designated as a controlled substance starting July 1.

Health workers in Nashville have turned their focus to homeless people amid a growing outbreak of hepatitis A and some of the first diagnosed cases among people living on the streets. They're finding it takes some convincing to get many to agree to a vaccination.

Only one Republican running to be Tennessee's next governor is open to the idea of allowing sports betting.

The question came up during a GOP debate in Hendersonville on Wednesday night. A recent federal court ruling paves the way for states to legalize gambling on college and professional games.

No one's sure exactly why Tennessee's rate of teen pregnancy took a nosedive in the most recent figures, but their best guess: more kids are abstaining from sex. Tennessee's teen pregnancy rate has dropped for the last two decades as the national figure has also declined.

Tennessee's agency that administers food stamps and cash assistance programs says it has fundamentally altered its approach: designing programs to benefit entire households, rather than choosing between children and their parents.

After months of resisting pressure from doctors, Tennessee's Medicaid program is slowing down an initiative meant to make physicians more cost conscious. They've complained about the so-called "episodes of care" payment model since its inception, though doctors initially cooperated with state officials in designing the program.

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