Blake Farmer

Jack Daniel's is a historic brand built on stories and legend. To this day, all of the whiskey is made in the hills of little Lynchburg, Tenn. And as part of its 150th anniversary, the company is highlighting a lesser-known part of its story: how a slave played a key role in its founding.

Each year, 300,000 people find their way off the beaten path to visit the Jack Daniel's distillery, where until recently, no one could even partake in the famous Old No. 7. But the fact that Lynchburg is in a dry country has only increased the allure. This is a brand built on story and legend.

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