Chas Sisk

Chas joined WPLN in 2015 after eight years with The Tennessean, including more than five years as the newspaper's statehouse reporter.Chas has also covered communities, politics and business in Massachusetts and Washington, D.C. Chas grew up in South Carolina and attended Columbia University in New York, where he studied economics and journalism. Outside of work, he's a dedicated distance runner, having completed a dozen marathons

Plans to set up a school voucher program are dead in the Tennessee state legislature, once again.

The proposal would have created a pilot program for low-income students assigned to struggling schools in Memphis. They would've been able to use the vouchers in private schools.

Governor Bill Haslam is calling for spending $55 million more next year to jumpstart road construction — as well as millions more for mental health, disability service providers and a new Library & Archives building — as part of a supplemental spending plan released Tuesday morning.

The budget measure is one of the last things state lawmakers consider before adjourning for the year.

Williamson County businessman Bill Lee officially announced Monday that he's entering the race for governor, hoping to become the first person in 40 years to take the position without ever having held elected office.

Lee kicked off his campaign on Nashville's Bicentennial Mall. The chairman of Lee Company, a Middle Tennessee facilities management and home services company, rolled out a recreational vehicle that he plans to take around the state to introduce himself.

Governor Bill Haslam’s plan to raise the gas tax, the IMPROVE Act, has been one of the major stories of this year’s legislative session.

Lawmakers could close the book on that debate this week. So what else is left to be done?

Nashville Public Radio's Jason Moon Wilkins sat down with statehouse reporter Chas Sisk to talk about that.

Transcript:

Tennessee lawmakers may soon be required to disclose when they travel on someone else's dime.

The measure comes after advocates footed the bill for some legislators to go to Florida, North Carolina and even Europe.

After nearly three months of debate, Tennessee lawmakers are on the verge of sending Governor Bill Haslam a plan to pay for roads by raising the state's gas tax.

It's more or less the proposal Haslam asked for. But getting it through the legislature was a long, hard slog.

None of the House of Representatives' leaders was eager to present the plan. So state Rep. Barry Doss, a little-known contractor from Lawrence County, drew the task.

A proposal meant to give lawmakers more opportunities to override vetoes of controversial legislation could be tripped up by a separate measure that would dramatically increase how much money state senators can raise.

The dispute between the Tennessee House of Representatives and the state Senate could come to a showdown as lawmakers wrap up this year's legislative session.

Lawmakers have again rejected a proposal to offer in-state tuition to undocumented students who graduate from Tennessee high schools.

The plan was debated for the second time in three years, and there had been some signs it might have a chance of passing. But skeptics say they're still unwilling to extend any benefits to people who came to the U.S. illegally, even children.

It was beginning to look last week like the road was finally beginning to clear for Governor Bill Haslam’s transportation plan and gas tax hike.

Then, some legislative leaders from the governor's own party cut in.

Now, the Tennessee legislature is set for what could be a make-or-break week.

Nashville Public Radio's Jason Moon Wilkins sat down with statehouse reporter Chas Sisk to lay out the route ahead.

A measure that would have let off-duty police officers carry guns into any ticketed event was voted down Wednesday in the state legislature.

The broadly worded proposal was designed to override policies banning guns at private fundraisers, music festivals, even Tennessee Titans games.

Pages