Chas Sisk

Chas joined WPLN in 2015 after eight years with The Tennessean, including more than five years as the newspaper's statehouse reporter.Chas has also covered communities, politics and business in Massachusetts and Washington, D.C. Chas grew up in South Carolina and attended Columbia University in New York, where he studied economics and journalism. Outside of work, he's a dedicated distance runner, having completed a dozen marathons

Tennessee lawmakers blasted the state Department of Correction at a meeting on Wednesday, the day after an audit found numerous violations in the state's prisons.

The state of Tennessee is asking for $2 million next year to whip the Memphis Regional Megasite into shape, a process that will include hiring an outside consultant to assess why the decade-long project hasn't yet landed a major manufacturer.

Tennessee Sen. Bob Corker delivered his harshest criticism yet of President Donald Trump on Tuesday, again questioning the Republican leader's competency, calling the president untruthful, and implying for the first time that he now regrets supporting Trump.

One of the former leaders of the Tennessee Republican Party says he and other top officials tried to stop an unofficial Twitter account that's being linked to Russian trolls.

Former Tennessee Republican Party executive director Brent Leatherwood condemns the account as "anti-American."

U.S. Rep. Marsha Blackburn says Congress will start work next week on fixing any damage that may have been caused by an opioid measure that she helped get passed into law.

Midday at the senior center in Dickson, and Police Sergeant David Cole is giving his audience a pep talk.

He admits that seemingly random killings have injected an element of fear into public life. One that could lead people to conclude that they're defenseless any time they gather together.

"And some people would say, 'I can defend against it. I won't go,'" he says, triggering a knowing chuckle from the audience. "Well, if you don't do that, they win. They win."

Poor Tennesseans who find themselves in the justice system could be about to get some more legal help, as the state Supreme Court has approved a plan meant to improve Tennessee's system of indigent representation.

But, justices say, the proposal is going to require some help from the governor and state lawmakers.

Gov. Bill Haslam is voicing some frustration about the prospects for health care reform following the failure of the latest plan to replace and repeal the Affordable Care Act.

Unemployment in Tennessee stands at record lows, but some advocates for the poor nonetheless worry about how plans to reinstate the work requirement for food stamps will play out.

Their fear is that, in many parts of Tennessee, the jobs just won't be there.

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam is cheering the latest effort to repeal the Affordable Care Act, while opponents of the measure are scrambling to derail it before the legislation can pass the U.S. Senate.

Haslam joined 14 other Republican governors Wednesday in signing a letter praising a plan to repeal the ACA's individual mandate, to do away with the requirement that individuals purchase insurance and to convert Medicaid to a system of so-called block grants to the states.

In an appearance in Chattanooga, Haslam called the proposal, known as Graham-Cassidy, a "home run for Tennessee" because the state will receive more money than it currently does for Medicaid.

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