Chas Sisk

Chas joined WPLN in 2015 after eight years with The Tennessean, including more than five years as the newspaper's statehouse reporter.Chas has also covered communities, politics and business in Massachusetts and Washington, D.C. Chas grew up in South Carolina and attended Columbia University in New York, where he studied economics and journalism. Outside of work, he's a dedicated distance runner, having completed a dozen marathons

Tennessee lawmakers have rejected a measure that would've restricted which bathroom transgender students can use, apparently putting an end to the debate for the year.

A Senate panel on Wednesday declined to take up a proposal that would have required transgender students to use the bathroom of the sex on their birth certificate.

Plans to make marijuana legal for medicinal use appear unlikely to go anywhere this year in the Tennessee legislature, after one of the lawmakers behind the effort says he needs more time to build support.

State Rep. Jeremy Faison, R-Cosby, says he plans to turn his proposal to allow medical marijuana and other plans like it over to a task force that will meet after this year's legislative session. Faison has been a major supporter of medical marijuana, and he claims, in private, many lawmakers tell him they're ready to embrace it.

The Republican rework of Obamacare is forcing states to figure out what it means for them.

And so far, they're not cheering in the Tennessee legislature.

WPLN's Chas Sisk joins us to explain how the health care plan is playing here.

Some might think that feeding milk to a calf couldn't be all that hard. But ask state Sen. Jim Tracy.

"Easy, easy," the Shelbyville Republican said as he attempted to steady a hungry, month-old Holstein named Raven. "Go baby go. That's good stuff, man, come on."

In one of several signs of trouble for the idea, Tennessee's attorney general says a proposed ban on abortions once a heartbeat can be detected is "constitutionally suspect." The proposal was debated this week in the state legislature.

From the Office of the Attorney General, sent to Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Brian Kelsey:

The Tennessee State Museum is sharing images of what its new home will look like on the inside once completed.

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam could play a key role in determining what Republicans in Washington do next on health care.

Haslam is part of a team of eight governors tapped to advise the Trump administration and Congress on how they'd replace the Affordable Care Act. The group was assembled by Republican Governors Association chairman Scott Walker of Wisconsin.

Democrats in the Tennessee legislature are touting a list of policies that they say will benefit Tennessee's middle class.

Their "People's Bill of Rights" consists of five core principles that they say justify actions like raising the state's minimum wage, lessening sentences for marijuana possession and opposing school vouchers.

"This is going back to the basics," says House Minority Leader Craig Fitzhugh, D-Ripley. "There's not anything that you have not heard, and we have not been speaking about for years."

For the past several weeks, Republicans have been dealing with rambunctious crowds in town halls and in legislative corridors. It’s happening across the nation and in Tennessee.

They’ve sparked a debate: Are these authentic, grassroots protests of President Donald Trump, the Republicans in Congress and those controlling the Tennessee State Capitol? Or are they “Astro-turf” activists who’ve been paid to turn out?

Political reporter Chas Sisk and Jason Moon Wilkins discuss the debate.

Just up the road from the entrance to Fall Creek Falls State Park sits a motel.

"You know, this is not a kind of place that you come (to) if you want a spa treatment," owner Melissa Harmon says deprecatingly.

She and her husband have owned the Way Inn for a decade. It's your 1950s-style motor lodge: A long row of ground-level, drive-up rooms situated behind a diner and convenience store.

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