Chas Sisk

Chas joined WPLN in 2015 after eight years with The Tennessean, including more than five years as the newspaper's statehouse reporter.Chas has also covered communities, politics and business in Massachusetts and Washington, D.C. Chas grew up in South Carolina and attended Columbia University in New York, where he studied economics and journalism. Outside of work, he's a dedicated distance runner, having completed a dozen marathons

Preschool programs and raising the pay for teachers both got votes of confidence, as five of the major candidates for governor lined up at Belmont University Tuesday night to discuss education.

This post contains strong language.

Both of the Democrats who represent Tennessee districts in the Congress condemned language used by President Donald Trump to disparage several majority-black nations, but the state's Republicans were silent after asked to comment by Nashville Public Radio on Friday.

Democrats in the Tennessee legislature moved swiftly last week to make health care the first debate of the 2018 session.

This week hasn't just been the start of the General Assembly's 2018 legislative session. It's also been the unofficial debut of the state legislature's new office building.

In an address that took on the feel of one of his campaign rallies, President Donald Trump touted his record in his first year in office and told farmers gathered in Nashville that they're "lucky" he was willing to run for the White House and keep out Democrats.

Tennessee is in for an eventful few weeks, as lawmakers return to Nashville for the second year of the 110th General Assembly. And while it’s hard to predict what controversies will arise while they’re in session, it is clear that a huge wave of turnover is on the horizon.

A group of Nashville Kurds could be released from federal custody after spending nearly seven months in detention, after a judge in Michigan determined the government has not shown they're dangerous to the public or flight risks.

Worries about the safety of children as they travel to and from school has led to two new laws that go into effect Jan. 1 in Tennessee.

But state leaders also fear college students have been overly protected, a situation they've also decided to address with a new law.

They're among the measures that take effect as the calendar turns the page to 2018. Jan. 1 is one of the two dates Tennessee lawmakers typically choose for legislation to take effect.

Tim White works for the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency.

That puts him on the front line of any change in the state's fauna, including the arrival of armadillos.

After more than a decade of planning, the state of Tennessee has started construction on a new Library & Archives building, as officials formally broke ground Monday at the corner of Sixth Avenue North and Jefferson Street.

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