Chas Sisk

Chas joined WPLN in 2015 after eight years with The Tennessean, including more than five years as the newspaper's statehouse reporter.Chas has also covered communities, politics and business in Massachusetts and Washington, D.C. Chas grew up in South Carolina and attended Columbia University in New York, where he studied economics and journalism. Outside of work, he's a dedicated distance runner, having completed a dozen marathons

The Tennessee legislative session came to a late-night end last week, but some of the bills approved in the final hours might not make it all the way to becoming law.

In this week's edition of The Tri-Star State, Nashville Public Radio's Jason Moon Wilkins and statehouse reporter Chas Sisk discuss what legislation could miss the governor’s signature, as well as other lingering issues.

Tennessee lawmakers wrapped up business Wednesday night, after an arduous final day at the state Capitol dominated by a standoff over TNReady and a dispute over a constitutional amendment.

The House of Representatives and the state Senate spent most of the day locked in a bitter dispute over whether teachers are really going to be protected from repercussions if this year's TNReady scores turn out to be flawed. Last week's exams were overshadowed by frequent interruptions. 

Tennessee lawmakers have given initial approval to a resolution to amend the state constitution to say that "liberties do not come from government, but from Almighty God."

The big debates appeared to be behind the Tennessee Legislature, which has been in a wrap-up phase for the last week or two. Then a move to "punish" Memphis and a cyberattack on standardized tests injected high drama into the final days of the session.

In this week's edition of The Tri-Star State, WPLN's Jason Moon Wilkins and statehouse reporter Chas Sisk look at why a budget decision stirred a national debate on race and how lawmakers addressed more trouble with TNReady.

Tennessee lawmakers have approved a measure meant to protect students, teachers and schools from being penalized for irregularities in this year's TNReady test.

Both chambers of the state legislature swiftly passed the legislation this afternoon, just days after a suspected cyberattack caused computerized tests to shut down.

Tennessee education officials got a grilling Wednesday from state lawmakers about the suspected cyberattack that shut down standardized testing earlier this week.

But officials say they're not sure who would have tried to hack the TNReady tests — or why.

Last week state lawmakers rejected nearly half the candidates for the University of Tennessee’s newly revamped Board of Trustees.

State senators have rejected nearly half of Bill Haslam's nominees to the University of Tennessee's Board of Trustees, dealing a surprise blow to the governor.

A Senate panel voted down three nominees who are serving on the university's current board, as well as a fourth candidate because he's a lobbyist. A fifth person also withdrew from consideration.

The Tennessee House has approved a measure that would let consumers buy a bottle of wine or liquor on Sundays.

Over the past week, there's been a flurry of bills passing or failing or simply being shelved for review by the Tennessee General Assembly. Lawmakers are rushing toward the end of the legislative session as most are preparing for campaign season.

It can be confusing to keep up with the fate of the would-be laws that have been making headlines this year.

Nashville Public Radio's Jason Moon Wilkins and statehouse reporter Chas Sisk sort it out in this week's edition of The Tri-Star State.

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