Chas Sisk

Chas joined WPLN in 2015 after eight years with The Tennessean, including more than five years as the newspaper's statehouse reporter.Chas has also covered communities, politics and business in Massachusetts and Washington, D.C. Chas grew up in South Carolina and attended Columbia University in New York, where he studied economics and journalism. Outside of work, he's a dedicated distance runner, having completed a dozen marathons

You may have heard that Tennessee's gas tax rose by 4 cents a gallon over the weekend. But that's only one of dozens of laws that went into effect.

Nearly 800,000 Tennessee drivers are expected to hit the road this weekend — one of the busiest driving times of the year.

And not even an extra four cents in state taxes added to the price of a gallon of gasoline is going to stop them.

Charlie Morris vividly recalls his brother's murder.

Jesse Lee Bond was a sharecropper in Shelby County. Suspicious because his harvests never seemed to cover his debts, in the spring of 1939, Bond asked the local general store for a receipt of his seed purchases.

For his diligence, he was shot, castrated, dragged and left for dead in the Hatchie River.

Governor Bill Haslam says he'll stay out of the debate over how much Nashville law enforcement must cooperate with federal immigration authorities, but he doubts the city will have much luck if it hopes to defy President Trump.

The Metro Council is expected to start discussion of some limits later this month. The proposals include requiring federal authorities to present a warrant if they want immigrants to be held longer than U.S.-born arrestees. The ordinance undergoes its first reading — typically a formality — on Tuesday night. 

Haslam says he isn't going to stand in the council's way.

Gov. Bill Haslam does not anticipate much help from President Trump in rebuilding the state's roads and bridges.

The president is expected to announce a new plan this week to upgrade infrastructure around the country, after promising during last year's campaign to spend $1 trillion dollars on transportation improvements. But he appears to want states to partner with private operators on projects like toll roads, and Haslam notes that's something Tennessee has never done to pay for highways.

Congressman Diane Black.

That's who Tennesseans say they're most familiar with as the race to succeed Governor Bill Haslam begins. Just under half of all voters say in a new statewide poll they've heard of her.

A measure that would make it easier for gun owners and groups like the National Rifle Association to sue cities over gun bans appears to be on its way to becoming Tennessee law.

Governor Bill Haslam says he's still reviewing the legislation, but his recent comments suggest he has no intention of using a veto on it.

When Tennessee lawmakers passed a gas tax increase this spring, they also approved a to-do list of nearly 1,000 projects spread around the state.

Gov. Bill Haslam had a pretty good year when it comes to wins and losses in the General Assembly. The Tennessee legislature has — in past years — picked fights with the two-term governor.

WPLN’s Chas Sisk and Jason Moon Wilkins talk about how Haslam’s approach to passing legislation has evolved.

Democrats in Tennessee have been struggling to remain relevant, given their greatly diminished numbers in the state legislature.

WPLN’s statehouse reporter Chas Sisk is with morning host Jason Moon Wilkins to look at how the minority party did in the 2017 session, which concluded this week.

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