Christopher Blank

News Director

It all started with ghost stories. Dad convinced me that spirits lurked just outside my bedroom door at night. After years of night terrors, I began listening to LPs of spooky tales, memorizing them and acting them out around campfires on those balmy winter nights in South Florida. In this way, other children would suffer as I had.
Naturally, this dramatic flair evolved into a prestigious four-year engagement on the high school drama circuit where my mother’s rapturous reviews provoked standing ovations also from my mother.
One day, while working part time as a copy clerk at the St. Petersburg Times, an editor asked me why my hair was dyed bright orange. I explained that it was because I was “an actor.” Was my future decided out of pity? Out of concern for my mental health? I cannot read minds. However, the next thing that happened is that I was made a theater critic.
For more than a decade, The Commercial Appeal’s readers tolerated my opinions on everything from classical music to ballet. Even WKNO-FM let me create a little club for theatergoers.
When this fine radio station went looking for someone to tell stories of the “news” variety, I made the argument that Memphis is a city full of great stories; no other has a richer cultural narrative. The crossroads of America is a crucible of stories from all walks of life. Also, crossroads are known for ghosts and devils, and who doesn’t love those?
They totally bought the argument. So now, I’m looking for great stories. What’s yours?

Ways To Connect

Memphis' Pinch District holds special meaning for novelist Steve Stern, a professor living in upstate New York.

Christopher Blank

Who was that stoic figure holding B.B. King's guitar in Wednesday's funeral procession down Beale?

Memphis writer and editor Richard J. Alley's debut novel "Five Night Stand" has a stylish touch, says book critic Peggy Burch.

Christopher Blank

Thousands gathered to bid farewell to the late bluesman who got his start in Memphis.

Christopher Blank

When B.B. King put together his first band, Floyd Newman was among his first hires.

Memphis is a city of legendary music and musicians. It's time our streets get some soul. 

Christopher Blank


The great bluesman B.B. King died Thursday (May 14)  in Las Vegas. But in the two cities most associated with his life, his legacy is more than just the blues.

It's pitmaster vs. pitmaster at Memphis in May's World Championship Barbecue Cooking Contest.


On Friday, the Blues Foundation opens its brand new Blues Hall of Fame at 421 South Main Street in Memphis. It honors the many musicians, from the Mississippi Delta cotton fields to the nightclubs of Chicago, who have risen to the top of the art form.

On WKNO Culture Desk, Blues Foundation president and C.E.O. Jay Sieleman explains what makes Memphis the "Home of the Blues" and why its important to honor these often marginalized players.

Once considered a humble -- if messy -- finger food, chicken wings and drummies are on the rise even in Memphis' best barbecue joints.

Commercial Appeal food critic Jennifer Biggs says that wings have come along way from the spicy, fried and sauced appetizer that originated in Buffalo in the 1960s. Memphis restaurants now serve them in a variety of styles, though it's not uncommon to smoke them. After all, Memphis is where smoked meat is king.