Daniel Breen

Daniel Breen is a third-year undergraduate journalism student at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock.

His interest in writing began at a young age, and later served as a reporter and editor for Little Rock Central High School’s Tiger Newspaper. He has served as a production intern for both radio and TV stations, and has had much experience in the editing and creation of media.

Research interests include multimedia, investigative, and citizen journalism as well as current events, politics, and justice. Daniel hopes to work in the field of public broadcasting upon graduation.

In his spare time, Daniel enjoys playing guitar, reading, drinking copious amounts of coffee, and exploring the wilderness of Arkansas.

Little Rock Central High School is now joining five other sites across the city as part of a national project highlighting historically significant locations in the civil rights era.

The U.S. Civil Rights Trail includes over 100 museums, churches, and other landmarks across 14 states and Washington, D.C. that played a role in the struggle for equal rights for African-Americans in the 1950s and 60s.

For many, 2017 was a time of historic support for the rights of LGBTQ people. But, the Human Rights Campaign Foundation, the educational arm of the nation’s largest LGBTQ civil rights organization, says more can be done to improve equality in  Arkansans.

  

Adding to Congress’s already lengthy to-do list, the federal government’s primary tool for agricultural and food policy, known as the farm bill, will need congressional reauthorization this year.  Originally designed to keep crop prices fair for consumers and farmers during the Great Depression, the bill is a piece of legislation with broad-reaching effects, especially for Arkansans.

Despite a slight drop in Arkansas sales tax revenue between the second and third quarters of fiscal year 2017, the holiday shopping season is expected to give the state’s economy a temporary boost.

Chief Economist Michael Pakko with the Arkansas Economic Development Institute at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock said a decrease in taxable sales between the two quarters still represents a picture of overall growth.

Members of the Capitol Arts and Grounds Committee will be holding three hearings over the next two weeks to finalize changes to a new Ten Commandments monument at the Arkansas State Capitol.

With two games left in the Razorback football season, University of Arkansas Vice Chancellor and Director of Athletics Jeff Long has been let go effective immediately.

The move comes a week after a lengthy meeting of the university’s Board of Trustees where no action was taken against Long. Chancellor Joseph Steinmetz announced Long’s firing in a press release Wednesday.

Six researchers are laying out details of how they plan to study the causes of childhood obesity. The Center for Childhood Obesity Prevention at the Arkansas Children’s Research Institute announced its first round of projects Wednesday.

Created last year through a $9.4 million grant from the National Institutes of Health, the Center for Childhood Obesity Prevention seeks to address all levels of the issues surrounding overweight kids.

As the Nov. 9 execution date for convicted killer Jack Greene draws near, the Arkansas Parole Board is considering whether to recommend the governor grant him clemency.

Jack Gordon Greene was convicted in 1992 of murdering pastor Sidney Burnett at his home near Clarksville. Greene bound, stabbed, and beat Burnett to death just three days after murdering his own brother, Tommy, in North Carolina.

A federal judge has blocked a new law that seeks to restrict panhandling in Arkansas. The law was the second attempt by the Arkansas Legislature to ban people from asking for money and other help on most sidewalks and intersections.

Despite the law passing with bipartisan support, U.S. District Court Judge Billy Roy Wilson said the law proposed by Rep. Charlie Collins (R-Fayetteville) is “plainly unconstitutional.” Collins tells KUAR News he authored the law to put an end to threatening conduct by panhandlers.

Potential operators of medical marijuana cultivation facilities and dispensaries came together at a half-day symposium in Little Rock Wednesday to discuss their expectations of what the new industry will be like.

Among the attendees was TV host Montel Williams, who gave the keynote address at the event organized by the Arkansas Medical Marijuana Association. Williams has multiple sclerosis, and has long advocated for medicinal cannabis use. His visit had added significance, since he recently accepted a position on the association’s board.

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