Jim Zarroli

Jim Zarroli is a business reporter for NPR News, based at NPR's New York bureau.

He covers economics and business news including fiscal policy, the Federal Reserve, the job market and taxes

Over the years, he's reported on recessions and booms, crashes and rallies, and a long string of tax dodgers, insider traders and Ponzi schemers. He's been heavily involved in the coverage of the European debt crisis and the bank bailouts in the United States.

Prior to moving into his current role, Zarroli served as a New York-based general assignment reporter for NPR News. While in this position he covered the United Nations during the first Gulf War. Zarroli added to NPR's coverage of the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, the London transit bombings and the September 11, 2001 attacks on the World Trade Center.

Before joining the NPR in 1996, Zarroli worked for the Pittsburgh Press and wrote for various print publications.

Zarroli graduated from Pennsylvania State University.


5:27 pm
Thu June 11, 2015

U.S. Export-Import Bank Targeted By Conservatives

A Boeing 737 at the company's factory in Renton, Wash. Foreign airlines that want to buy Boeing planes often do so with loans underwritten by the Export-Import Bank.
Saul Loeb AP

Originally published on Thu June 11, 2015 6:48 pm

Republicans are often seen as the party of business. So it's a little ironic that some of the most vocal opposition to the Export-Import Bank comes from conservative Republicans, such as Ohio Rep. Jim Jordan.

"If we're ever going to get rid of all the corporate connectedness, all the corporate welfare, you've got to start with the most egregious one and the most obvious one and that's the Export-Import Bank," he says.

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10:15 am
Wed May 20, 2015

'Cartel' Of 4 Big Banks To Plead Guilty To Gaming The Exchange Rate

Originally published on Wed May 20, 2015 11:09 am

Four major banks — Citicorp, JPMorgan Chase, Barclays and the Royal Bank of Scotland — have agreed to plead guilty to currency manipulation and pay over $5 billion in fines. Officials say that traders from the banks, who allegedly called themselves "the cartel," used secret codes to manipulate the exchange rate between U.S. dollars and Euros. Meanwhile, the Justice Department has taken the unusual step of tossing out what's called a deferred prosecution agreement against a fifth bank.

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8:33 am
Tue May 12, 2015

Verizon Acquires AOL For $4.4 Billion

Originally published on Tue May 12, 2015 9:11 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

All Tech Considered
4:09 pm
Fri May 1, 2015

The Annual Shareholders' Meeting Will Now Come To Order Online

Dynegy is one of a growing number of companies to hold meetings online.

Originally published on Fri May 1, 2015 8:18 pm

The annual meeting is a staple of corporate life. It's a chance for even a small shareholder to take the measure of a company's managers, to ask a question or express a beef about a company actions.

But here's the dirty secret about shareholder meetings: Unless the company is huge or there's some controversy going on, hardly anyone shows up.

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8:33 am
Sat April 25, 2015

Who, Or What, Crashed The Market In A Flash In 2010?

A reporter stands outside the front door of a house registered to a trading company operated by Navinder Singh Sarao in Hounslow, west of London. on April 22, 2015. Sarao was arrested in connection with the Wall Street flash crash of 2010.
Adrian Dennis AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 27, 2015 1:15 pm

It has been five years since the so-called flash crash on Wall Street raised big questions about computerized trading. What caused the flash crash has been a topic of debate ever since. U.S. officials revived the debate this week by arresting a little-known trader in London.

May 6, 2010 started out as an ordinary trading day on Wall Street. Then, at around 2:45 in the afternoon, the Dow Jones Industrial Average plunged nearly 600 points within the space of a few minutes, before correcting itself.

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