Jonathan Judaken

This summer marks the 300th anniversary of Jean Jacques Rousseau's birth in the city of Geneva in 1812.

Eric Foner, DeWitt Clinton Professor of History at Columbia University is one of this country's most prominent historians.

Host Jonathan Judaken talks with Timothy Snyder about his acclaimed book Bloodlands: Europe Between Hitler and Stalin.

Jonathan D. Sarna is the Joseph H. and Belle R. Braun Professor of American Jewish History at Brandeis University and chief historian of the National Museum of American Jewish History. 

Paul Mendes-Flohr is a leading scholar of modern Jewish thought, Jewish existentialism, German-Jewish intellectual history, and the foremost living scholar of Martin Buber.

Jane Landers is Gertrude Conaway Vanderbilt Professor of History, former Associate Dean of the College of Arts & Science and past Director of the Center for Latin American Studies. She is the author of Atlantic Creoles in the Age of Revolutions which was awarded the Rembert Patrick Book Award and has been awarded honorary mention for the 2011 Bolton Johnson Prize for the best English-language book on any aspect of Latin American History. 

Russell A. Berman is an American professor of German Studies and Comparative Literature. In a moment when readership is down, and when economic resources are scarce, he and host Jonathan Judaken discuss the importance of the study of literature and of the humanities at this transformative moment in Western Culture.

John Soares /

Host Jonathan Judaken talks with renowned M.I.T. Professor of Linguistics and Philosophy Noam Chomsky.

An unrelenting critic of social injustice and state violence, in one scholar's words, “Chomsky's method involves a relentless erudition: scouring alternative sources; exhuming buried documents; reviving forgotten or abandoned histories.”  They discuss Chomsky's childhood and upbringing, his opposition to the war in Vietnam, Cambodia, and Laos, and his thoughts on the Tea Party and the Occupy movements.

Host Jonathan Judaken talks with South African poet and journalist Antjie Krog. Krog has established herself as one of South Africa's leading Afrikaans poets, later distinguishing herself as the lead radio reporter covering the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. Her book, Country of My Skull: Guilt, Sorrow, and the Limits of Forgiveness in the New South Africa, is one of the defining works on the meaning of the South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission. 

Originally Broadcast 14 November 2011.