Julieta Martinelli

Martinelli is a newsroom fellow at WPLN. She began as an intern at the station, where she reported on immigration, social issues and criminal justice issues, among other topics. Before arriving in Nashville, she split her time between the assignment desk and the investigative team at CBS 46, one of Atlanta's top-rated news stations. She has produced news segments and worked as a production manager for several live shows produced in conjunction with Georgia Public Broadcasting.  She graduated with a degree in Journalism and a minor in criminal justice from Georgia State University in May 2017. 

Before attaining her degree, Martinelli spent five years managing operations and media for a major Atlanta law firm and also worked as a writer and copy editor for Real Atlanta Magazine, a now-defunct bilingual monthly. She has previously interned at Gwinnett Daily Post, Georgia's second largest daily newspaper, and Atlanta Latino, a Spanish-language weekly, where she stayed on to report on immigration, education and issues affecting the local community. Martinelli is a National Association of Hispanic Journalists scholarship winner, a NAHJ-NABJ 2016 Student Projects fellow and in 2017 was named a Chips Quinn Scholar by the Newseum Institute.

The Tennessee Legislature has revived debate over granting in-state tuition to undocumented students. On Tuesday afternoon, a House subcommittee took the first action for the year, approving a bill which would allow all students who spend at least three years in a Tennessee high school to pay in-state rates at public colleges, regardless of their immigration status.

A group of citizens who have advocated for a community oversight board to review claims of police misconduct will file an official ethics complaint later today against Mayor Megan Barry.

The complaint questions the potential repercussions of the mayor’s extramarital relationship with a police officer, Sgt. Rob Forrest, including her ability to act as an “honest broker” between the community and Metro Police.

The Tennessee Bureau of Investigation will look into Nashville Mayor Megan Barry’s extramarital affair with the head of her security detail. This morning the city’s top prosecutor, District Attorney Glenn Funk, asked the state agency to find out whether any laws were broken by the illicit relationship, including misappropriation of public funds and official misconduct.

Some courthouses in Tennessee will soon have a special laptop computer and printer in their lobbies, called “court kiosks.” They're designed to help those who can’t afford — or choose not to hire — a lawyer, and are representing themselves in civil cases.


As the holiday shopping season ends and return season begins, customers might not realize that many of those items they send back could end up in landfills across the country.

Murfreesboro is one of the fastest growing cities in Tennessee, and like many in the South, it has a busy town square where locals often hang out, shop and dine.

But this weekend, it's probably going to look very different.


Many of the businesses in the area where two white nationalist rallies are expected to happen next Saturday will be closing their doors. Most of the establishments affected are small, private businesses, like hair salons and real estate offices.

When members of white nationalist groups declared that they planned to rally in Shelbyville and Murfreesboro at the end of the month, some asked how the cities could allow such a thing.


For three years, the Tennessee Highway Patrol has been using special software to predict where serious or fatal crashes might happen and then sending Troopers there in hopes of preventing them. They are now sharing that technology with every county sheriff’s office in the state.


The deadly mass shooting at a country music festival in Las Vegas hit close to home for many Nashvillians. They responded last night with words of encouragement — and country music.