Justin Willingham

Host - All Things Considered

My mother introduced me to WKNO-FM and public radio long before I can remember. I suppose the first thing I really recall about WKNO-FM is that every afternoon, when my mother picked me up from school, the radio was tuned-in to The World, then All Things Considered, probably beginning around age 8. The way these reporters and hosts took you from the comfort of your mom's van to wherever in the world they were reporting from absolutely fascinated me. From then on, I was officially hooked.

I first volunteered for Sally Stover at age 15 (1998), working long shifts during the Action Auction and then as her unofficial summer intern. I would sneak back into radio and try to casually introduce myself to the on-air personalities (Kacky and Darel), hoping they'd say, “Hey! You've got just the voice we need for the radio!”

After returning to Memphis from Indiana University in Bloomington in 2006, I had the opportunity to work part-time as the Monday afternoon host on FM 88.9 and Saturday mornings on FM 91.1. Soon thereafter, I was asked to be the local host for All Things Considered and Marketplace every weekday. In 2008, I took over production duties and became the Assistant Operations Manager, editing shows such as The Memphis Symphony Radio Hour and engineering Friday Live Lunch. Since then, my job has included editing all of John Malmo's commentaries, Memphis Moments with Steve Pike, and being the producer of our newest radio program, Counterpoint, with Jonathan Judaken.

WKNO-FM is my constant source for news and information. My dog, Ethel, also enjoys listening every afternoon to All Things Considered, while I'm away at work. With the creation of our HD-2 and HD-3 streams, I am constantly connected to the news that matters, no matter where I am or what I am doing. I am very grateful and lucky to get to work at a job that constantly feeds my mind with informative conversations, interviews, music, and entertainment. I am proud to be a tiny part of WKNO-FM Memphis.

Ways to Connect

The University of North Carolina Press / Bill Ferris

As the author or editor of many books and at least 15 documentary films, Bill Ferris has long been helping us to reflect on Southern culture. Dr. Jonathan Judaken discusses the history of the South with Dr. Bill Ferris in a fascinating interview.


Thomas Christensen / CounterpointPress

The world of 1616 was a world of motion. Enormous galleons carrying silk and silver across the Pacific created the first true global economy, and the first international corporations were emerging as economic powers.


Stephen V. Ash

Stephen Ash on his book - A Massacre in Memphis: The Race Riot that Shook the Nation One Year After the Civil War.


Host Jonathan Judaken talks with world-renowned conceptual artist Mel Chin before his upcoming lecture at Rhodes: "Stuck Inside of Mobile with the Memphis Blues Again - Our Place in the Age of a Dystopian Future."


Ethan B. Katz

Host Jonathan Judaken talks with author Ethan Katz, about his book, The Burdens of Brotherhood: Jews and Muslims from North Africa to France, which was a recent winner of the National Jewish Book Award. 


Dave Eggers

Host Jonathan Judaken talks with renowned author Dave Eggers and Valentino Achak Deng about the 2015 Memphis Reads selection What is the What, which recounts Valentino’s epic trek as a Sudanese Lost Boy seeking refuge in the midst of the carnage of war.


Mike Davis

Mike Davis helps explain how we might change the one billion people live in fetid conditions, including 80% of those urbanites in the underdeveloped world according to the United Nations. 


Sven Beckert

The cotton industry’s claim that “Cotton is the fabric of our lives” proves true. Sven Beckert’s award-winning work The Empire of Cotton: A Global History explains why. 


Devra Lehmann

Devra Lehmann’s new book, Spinoza: The Outcast Thinker, is a National Jewish Book Award winner in the category of Young Adult Literature. 


Lisa Moses Leff

Lisa Moses Leff joins host Jonathan Judaken to discuss her new book, The Archive Thief: The Man Who Salvaged French Jewish History in the Wake of the Holocaust.  In the aftermath of the Holocaust, wracked by grief and determined to facilitate the writing of an objective history of catastrophe, the historian Zosa Szajkowski gathered evidence of the persecution from Jewish leaders in Paris and from the wreckage of bombed-out buildings in Berlin. Many Jews in France and the United States saw his collecting of those papers as a heroic effort; however, in time, this "rescuer" became a thief. Most of the documents he acquired in the 1950s—mostly pertaining to Jewish history in France since the seventeenth century—he stole from the archives.


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