Marilyn Geewax

Marilyn Geewax is a senior editor, assigning and editing business radio stories. She also serves as the national economics correspondent for the NPR web site, and regularly discusses economic issues on NPR's mid-day show Here & Now.

Her work contributed to NPR's 2011 Edward R. Murrow Award for hard news for "The Foreclosure Nightmare." Geewax also worked on the foreclosure-crisis coverage that was recognized with a 2009 Heywood Broun Award.

Before joining NPR in 2008, Geewax served as the national economics correspondent for Cox Newspapers' Washington Bureau. Before that, she worked at Cox's flagship paper, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, first as a business reporter and then as a columnist and editorial board member. She got her start as a business reporter for the Akron Beacon Journal.

Over the years, she has filed news stories from China, Japan, South Africa and Europe. Recently, she headed to Europe to participate in the RIAS German/American Journalist Exchange Program.

Geewax was a Nieman Fellow at Harvard, where she studied economics and international relations. She earned a master's degree at Georgetown University, focusing on international economic affairs, and has a bachelor's degree from The Ohio State University.

She is a member of the National Press Club's Board of Governors and serves on the Global Economic Reporting Initiative Committee for the Society of American Business Editors and Writers.


The Two-Way
2:45 pm
Wed June 17, 2015

Yes, Your Car Loan Will Still Be Cheap As Fed Holds Rates Low

Lincoln Mercury vehicles at a dealership lot in Sterling Heights, Mich.
Paul Sancya AP

Originally published on Wed June 17, 2015 3:48 pm

The Federal Reserve's policymakers Wednesday held steady on interest rates — and gave no specific time frame for when they might change course.

That was the expected outcome of their two-day meeting.

But this changed: The policymakers seemed a bit more optimistic about the U.S. economy. Their statement said that while inflation is very low, "economic activity has been expanding moderately."

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The Two-Way
11:00 am
Tue June 16, 2015

U.S. House Votes To Buy Time For Obama's Trade Agenda

Originally published on Wed June 17, 2015 4:10 pm

Updated at 2:55 p.m. ET

This afternoon, the U.S. House voted 236 to 189 to give itself six more weeks to sort out tangled legislation involving trade.

The House Republican leaders prodded their members to approve a rule change that extends time for a second vote on one part of a trade package. This portion, called Trade Adjustment Assistance, failed on Friday.

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The Two-Way
11:05 am
Fri June 12, 2015

Dealing Blow To Obama, Efforts To Pass Trade Plan Fail In The House

President Obama walks with House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi as he visits Capitol Hill on Friday.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Mon June 15, 2015 12:14 pm

Dealing a big blow to President Obama's agenda, the House of Representatives failed to pass a key element of a package of bills that would have given Obama the ability to fast-track a trade deal with Pacific Rim nations.

The House began by voting on a bill that would provide funding for training Americans who would lose their jobs because of the trade deal. Failing to attract enough Democratic votes, the body rejected the measure by a large margin.

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1:30 pm
Fri June 5, 2015

Teens Hoping For More Jobs, Higher Wages This Summer

José Moncada, 16, signed up for a summer youth employment program in New York City. He said hopes to earn enough to help his family, which lives on less than $30,000 a year.
Kaomi Goetz for NPR

Originally published on Mon June 8, 2015 2:10 pm

Recipe for a good summer-job market: First, hire a lot of people in May. Second, give workers raises, and third, push down gasoline prices. Mix it all together — and pour out hope for teen workers.

"Having a job makes me feel really excited. I can put my own money in my pocket instead of asking my parents for money all the time," said José Moncada, a 16-year-old job seeker in New York City.

Moncada and other teens may have caught a break Friday when the economy followed that seasonal employment recipe precisely.

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The Two-Way
6:24 pm
Fri May 15, 2015

Big 3 Airlines Say Foreign Competitors Are 'Dumping' Seats In U.S.

A Qatar Airways plane loads cargo on Feb. 3, 2013, at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York. The big three U.S. airlines — Delta, United and American — say Persian Gulf carriers like Qatar Airways, Emirates Airlines and Etihad are "dumping" seats in the U.S.
Robert Nickelsberg Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 15, 2015 6:45 pm

Many U.S. passengers who have been wedged into coach-class seats on long flights might welcome more flying options — even if that competition were to come from overseas.

But the chief executives for Delta, United and American airlines say it's not fair if such competition involves big government subsidies given to state-backed carriers.

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