Steve Pike

The UT Docs

Oct 29, 2013

In the fall, Southerners' fancies turn to football, and, in the 1920s, football included the amazing UT Docs. 

In 1920, the University of Tennessee School of Medicine was struggling to attract students, staff, and money. Students organized an informal team, the UT Docs. They played a few games, and they won. By 1922, they were better organized, better financed, and had hired a coach.

Harry Shipler (1910) / Shipler Commercial Photographers

Henry Ford founded a car company and changed our lives forever. His goal was to build a car that most families could afford, and he succeeded.

The first Model T was sold on October 1, 1908. To lower costs, Ford used standardized parts, mass production and an assembly line.

In 1914, it took 93 minutes to assemble a car. By 1925, new Fords rolled out every 10 seconds.

After making more than 15 million Model T’s, Ford ended production of the beloved “Tin Lizzies” in 1927. Even he admitted it was time for a change in style and another color besides black.

On December 4, 1956, Elvis dropped by Sun Studios to visit Sam Phillips. Although Elvis was now a recording star with RCA, he was still close to Phillips, his old friend and mentor. 

At the time, Carl Perkins and Jerry Lee Lewis were at the studio working together on some of Perkins' latest songs. When Johnny Cash happened to stop by, the four musicians started singing together.

Phillips knew he had a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. He called the Commercial Appeal, and they sent over a photographer. The result was the only performance of the “Million Dollar Quartet.”

John Erskine

Sep 17, 2013

Dr. John Erskine was buried in Elmwood Cemetery on September 17, 1878. Dr Erskine was a native of Alabama. He and his older brother moved to Memphis in the 1850s to practice medicine. He served as a surgeon during the Civil War.

Returning to Memphis after that, he became interested in public health and was appointed the city health officer. He was one of the 110 doctors who tended to the sick and dying during the deadly Yellow Fever epidemic of 1878.

September 10, 1884, is an important date in Memphis history, although one often forgotten. 

This was the day that the final spike was driven for the Yazoo and Mississippi Valley Railroad, later to become a part of the Illinois Central Gulf.

The railroad would open service between Memphis and Vicksburg, through the previously un-served Yazoo Delta. It opened the area to constant trade and year-round markets. Lumber, cotton, beans, and manufactured products were shipped on this new railroad.

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