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LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Linda Wertheimer.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Congress threatened itself with punishment if it failed to act. Lawmakers promised automatic spending cuts if a special committee failed to reduce the deficit. Now that they have failed, some want a way out of the punishment with which they had threatened themselves. This may be just one more episode in a long fight over taxes and spending, as we hear from NPR's Ari Shapiro.

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Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Linda Wertheimer.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning.

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The Occupy Wall Street movement saw mostly peaceful demonstrations across the country yesterday. In cities including Las Vegas, Washington, D.C., and Portland, occupiers were marking the second month of their movement. Dozens were arrested at a rally in Los Angeles and even more in New York City, where protesters tried to shut down Wall Street. NPR's Margot Adler reports.

Virtually all of Egypt's post-revolutionary political parties are planning major demonstrations in Cairo and other cities today in what amounts to a test of wills with the ruling military council over the direction of the country. At issue is a document from the generals aimed at guiding the drafting of a new constitution. Critics call it an attempt to enshrine military rule. Renee Montagne gets the latest news from NPR's Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson.

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Italy's new prime minister has pledged far-reaching reforms. An economist himself, Mario Monti has managed to win a vote of confidence for his new national unity government by an overwhelming majority in Italy's senate. Still, Europe's debt crisis is gathering more steam and now pushing borrowing costs for Spain and France sharply higher. As NPR's Sylvia Poggioli reports, pressure is mounting on the European Central Bank to act to stem the crisis.

(SOUNDBITE OF PROTEST)

With technocratic governments being formed in Italy and Greece, the euro may get a short-term bounce from the markets. But there is concern the changes afoot may not happen fast enough to end the eurozone debt mess.

For those of you desperately missing basketball during the NBA lockout, an antidote to your hoop pangs is on the way: A musical comedy about basketball will open for previews on Broadway on Nov. 12. It's called Lysistrata Jones and is based on the original Lysistrata, which, of course, was written by Aristophanes back in 411 B.C.

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