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Business
4:16 am
Thu June 28, 2012

Business News

Originally published on Thu June 28, 2012 11:34 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with a possible deeper debt for JPMorgan.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

Music
2:26 am
Thu June 28, 2012

The Bajo Quinto: The Instrument That Will Not Go Gently

Don Telesforo next to a bajo quinto, holding a jarana mixteca.
Courtesy of Ruben Luengas

Originally published on Thu June 28, 2012 11:34 am

Almost 20 years ago, a young student at the National University of Mexico went in search of a very old instrument in the mountains of the southern state of Oaxaca. Today, he has become a leading force in the revival of the instrument called the bajo quinto and the music played on it.

Ruben Luengas was working on a research project at the National School of Music in Mexico City in 1995. He wanted to focus on the music of his hometown, in the Mixtec region of Oaxaca, so he asked his 97-year-old grandmother to tell him about the music played at her wedding.

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The Salt
2:25 am
Thu June 28, 2012

Unlike Chicken And Pork, Beef Still Begins With Small Family Ranches

Barbara and Norman Roux stand in front of cattle pens on their farm outside of Moundridge, Kan., where she has raised cattle for nearly 70 years.
Peggy Lowe Harvest Public Media

Originally published on Thu June 28, 2012 6:47 pm

In the chicken and pork industries, nearly every aspect of the animals' raising has long been controlled by just a handful of agriculture conglomerates. But the cattle industry is still populated by mom-and-pop operations, at least at the calf-raising level.

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Asia
2:17 am
Thu June 28, 2012

Amid Fierce Debate, Japan To Restart Nuclear Plants

Anti-nuclear activists in front of the prime minister's official residence in Tokyo, June 22. Some 20,000 demonstrators protested against the Japanese government's decision to restart two idle nuclear reactors in western Japan, ending a brief period without any nuclear power generation.
Rie Ishii AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 28, 2012 11:34 am

After taking all 50 of its nuclear reactors offline following a devastating accident last year, Japan is planning to restart the first of two of them in western Fukui prefecture as early as Sunday.

The catastrophe at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant in March 2011 forced Japan to scale back plans to aggressively expand its nuclear energy sector. But the highly controversial move to restart the two reactors on the other side of the country is a sign that the nuclear power lobby isn't throwing in the towel yet.

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Middle East
2:17 am
Thu June 28, 2012

In A Syrian Souk, Support For The Regime Falters

People walk through Hamidiyah market in Damascus, Syria, Feb. 28. The merchants of this landmark bazaar were once ardent supporters of President Bashar Assad. That's no longer the case.
Bassem Tellawi AP

Originally published on Thu June 28, 2012 7:25 pm

In Syria's capital, Damascus, the Hamidiyah souk is a landmark — a centuries-old covered market linked to a maze of alleyways in the heart of the capital. Over the 15-month uprising, Syria's merchants have supported the regime of President Bashar Assad. But that support is crumbling.

Shops selling everything from cold drinks, ice cream and spices to wedding dresses and electric guitars line Hamidiyah's cobblestone streets.

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