Advertising

“Change” is a powerful word. 

Photo from The Memphis Public Library

If Wall Street had a big scoreboard showing the individual performance of corporate CEOs, you’d probably find that about eighty percent of them fell pretty much in the middle.

The very best advice about advertising is: if you have something important to say, just say it. If you don't, sing it. So it distresses me when I see advertising that says nothing, for a brand that really has something to say. And in the case of JC Penny, I mean, literally nothing.

I know why newspapers are in trouble. Sure, there’s been a flood of competitive media. Especially the Internet. And fewer people today want a whole lot more than headlines. And only we older people, apparently, appreciate a hands-on newspaper experience. 

Justin Willingham / WKNO-FM

Television’s share of American advertising dollars is expected to have grown this year by about one-and-a-half percentage points over last year.

How can that be, you ask. What about the enormous growth in the Internet, the explosion of social media advertising?

The splintering of advertising media has been like a fragmentation grenade. Media segments. Then the segments segment. And it’s this very splintering that each year makes television more valuable to advertisers. Because television remains the one medium that still can deliver a big audience.

David Smith / fotolia.com

Almost all retailers constantly are trying to think up ways to get more people into their stores. And it gets harder and harder to come up with new ploys.

But occasionally they come up with an offer so good that it scares them. So the retailer starts adding conditions to make the offer less costly to the store.

Listen to this offer from Staples: a coupon worth twenty dollars off an in-store purchase of twenty dollars or more. One day only at the Memphis store only.  

David Gilder / fotolia.com

Who ever thought he’d live to say, “Pity the poor bank.”

But, goodness, everybody’s after banks today. The president. Congress. Wall Street. Even the Wall Street Journal. Banks are today’s whipping boy.

Well I know a lot of bankers who are good guys, but, lordy, it’s hard to like a bank. It’s stuff like this. One day recently comes this letter from Chase Bank. I guess because one of my credit cards is a Chase Bank card. Right off the bat, the letter asks me to respond to update my preference for receiving offers by mail from Chase.

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