Yellow Fever

MEMPHIS MOMENTS
5:48 pm
Fri January 31, 2014

Lena Angevine Warner

Lena Angevine Warner

Lena Angevine Warner is rightfully known as Tennessee’s pioneer nurse, working with Walter Reed to discover that mosquitos were the carriers of Yellow Fever.

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Memphis Moments
5:32 pm
Tue September 17, 2013

John Erskine

Dr. John Erskine

Dr. John Erskine was buried in Elmwood Cemetery on September 17, 1878. Dr Erskine was a native of Alabama. He and his older brother moved to Memphis in the 1850s to practice medicine. He served as a surgeon during the Civil War.

Returning to Memphis after that, he became interested in public health and was appointed the city health officer. He was one of the 110 doctors who tended to the sick and dying during the deadly Yellow Fever epidemic of 1878.

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MEMPHIS MOMENTS
5:57 pm
Thu August 8, 2013

The Howard Association

In August of 1878, Memphis was struck with its most disastrous Yellow Fever epidemic. The Howard Association, a volunteer group of young businessmen, organized a medical corps to help the devastated city.

Volunteer physicians and nurses came from all over the country to treat the thousands of disease victims. Many stayed at the Peabody Hotel, the only hotel to stay open during the epidemic. Each physician was assigned to a district where they often started their rounds at dawn.

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Memphis Moments
5:48 pm
Tue May 14, 2013

Elmwood Cemetery

The Bridge Leading to Elmwood Cemetery

Elmwood Cemetery, founded in 1852, is the oldest active cemetery in Memphis. Fifty citizens put up $500 each to purchase and develop a 40-acre parcel of land. Another 40 acres were added later.

The name Elmwood was selected by a drawing from a list of proposed names. Elm trees had to be planted afterwards. 

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Memphis Moments
6:07 pm
Thu September 6, 2012

Annie Cook

There were many stories of heroism that arose out of the Yellow Fever outbreaks of the late 19th century, but none stand-out as much as the story of Annie Cook.

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