NAACP Honors Memphis Sanitation Workers Who Went On Strike In 1968

In 1968, 1,300 black men from the Memphis Department of Public Works went on strike after a malfunctioning truck crushed two garbage collectors to death. The strike led to marches with demonstrators carrying signs declaring "I Am A Man." Their organizing efforts drew support from the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. before his assassination. "We were just fighting for equal payment and equal rights from the sanitation department," Elmore Nickleberry, one of the workers who went on strike and...

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WKNO Features

A local author has a new cookbook out with a twist like no other!


Dr. Susan Warner

One local physician has combined her love of cooking, her long-term interest in nutrition, and her medical knowledge to create a culinary medicine practice.


Christopher Blank/WKNO-FM

A massive display of law enforcement from multiple Tennessee agencies, including additional assistance from Mississippi and Arkansas, greeted protesters concerned about the recent removal of Confederate statues from two Memphis parks. 

The rally organizers, through a Facebook page called Confederate 901, originally planned to meet at the Memphis welcome center Downtown and form a motorcade past the parks where statues of Jefferson Davis and General Nathan Bedford Forrest were removed in December. 

WKNO-TV

Perhaps the biggest Memphis headline of 2017 happened just a few days before Christmas. The City of Memphis sold two of its iconic parks to a newly minted nonprofit to expedite the removal of two Confederate monuments. This week on WKNO's Behind the Headines, the city's chief legal officer, Bruce McMullen, talks about the unseating of Civil War icons Nathan Bedford Forrest and Jefferson Davis with host Eric Barnes and Bill Dries of the Memphis Daily News

Lizy Heard / Church Health

With the New Year comes resolutions. 


WKNO-TV

As 2017 comes to an end, journalists look back on the year-that-was in Memphis and the Mid-South. This week's Behind the Headlines offers a roundtable discussion of the big stories that affected our community, from all the things that were built, to the few that were taken down. Karanja A. Ajanaku with the New Tri-State Defender, Toby Sells of the Memphis Flyer and Bill Dries of the Memphis Daily News joins host Eric Barnes.  

Cara Greenstein

Now that Christmas is over...

Houston Cofield for the Memphis Daily News

The bronze statue of Confederate General Nathan Bedford Forrest in Memphis' Health Sciences Park was removed Wednesday at a symbolic 9:01 p.m., after a city council vote handed the park to a nonprofit organization, thus circumventing a state law forbidding Tennessee cities from removing "war memorials" on public land. 

Justin Fox Burks

I have friends that boil fresh lobsters every Christmas Eve.


Memphis Libraries: Concerts, Games and, Oh Yes, Books

Dec 18, 2017
Renee Davis Brame

The Memphis Public Library has begun a reinvention, of sorts. “Re-branding” may be a better term. The strategy is called #StartHere.

But what does that mean, exactly?


Pages

A former Central Intelligence Agency officer is under arrest on charges of illegally retaining highly classified information relating to the U.S. spy network in China – including notebooks containing lists of informants and details of their operations, the Justice Department announced Tuesday.

Jerry Chun Shing Lee, 53, a naturalized U.S. citizen who now lives in Hong Kong, was taken into custody Monday night at New York's John F. Kennedy Airport.

Hey fam —

Code Switch is planning a full year of stories about the complex ways that race, identity and culture play out in peoples' lives, across the country and around the globe. And to make sure our coverage is the best it can be, we want some feedback from you.

So tell us what you loved and hated in our past year of coverage. Tell us which stories left you satisfied, and which left you wanting more. And tell us what you're dying to hear about in 2018.

To share your thoughts, email us at CodeSwitch@npr.org, or fill out this form.

When you're facing a major life change, it helps to talk to someone who has already been through it. All Things Considered is connecting people on either side of a shared experience, and they're letting us eavesdrop on their conversations in our series Been There.

Now, there is ample reason for you to cover your nose when you sneeze. It's flu season, after all, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has made it quite clear it doesn't want you spreading your germs with reckless abandon.

But let's not go overboard here, people.

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TENNESSEE NEWS

Tennessee Democrats Condemn Trump's Questioning Of Black Immigrants; Republicans Silent

This post contains strong language. Both of the Democrats who represent Tennessee districts in the Congress condemned language used by President Donald Trump to disparage several majority-black nations, but the state's Republicans were silent after asked to comment by Nashville Public Radio on Friday.

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ARKANSAS NEWS

Six Little Rock Landmarks Included In National Civil Rights Trail

Little Rock Central High School is now joining five other sites across the city as part of a national project highlighting historically significant locations in the civil rights era. The U.S. Civil Rights Trail includes over 100 museums, churches, and other landmarks across 14 states and Washington, D.C. that played a role in the struggle for equal rights for African-Americans in the 1950s and 60s. The result of a collaboration between twelve state tourism agencies, the trail was unveiled at...

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