Mister Rogers Still Lives In Your Neighborhood

It wasn't anything spectacular at the time. When the show first aired on Feb. 19, 1968, it seemed to be a typical children's educational program. On a black-and-white screen, a tall, dark-haired man nearing 40 years of age wandered into a staged living room, softly singing a song as he changed from a blazer into a much softer, cozy cardigan. That man, Fred Rogers of Mister Rogers' Neighborhood , quickly rose into recognition and a half-century later is still an American icon. "He's more...

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WKNO Features

Stax Museum of American Soul Music

Before the 1960s, if musicians wanted to make a political statement, they might do it with a song. Billie Holiday's "Strange Fruit" or Frank Sinatra's "The House I Live In" could be issued as commentary, yet still fly under the radar of politics. Today, many artists are expected to take more public and nuanced stands on issues, sometimes to their detriment. Zandria Robinson, sociology professor at Rhodes College, says that today's outspokenness is part of a changing industry, but not unprecedented. 


WKNO-TV

This week on WKNO's Behind the Headlines, our journalists' roundtable discussion digs into some current issues, including the controversy with Paint Memphis murals and questions about charter schools. Host Eric Barnes talks with Ryan Poe of the Commercial Appeal, Laura Faith Kebede of Chalkbeat Tennessee, Toby Sells of the Memphis Flyer and Bill Dries of the Memphis Daily News

Shirley Ann's Sweets

Valentine’s Day is tomorrow and if you are looking for a sweet treat for your Valentine, look no further.


This week on WKNO-TV's Behind the Headlines, Dr. Marjorie Hass, President of Rhodes College, discusses the impact of Rhodes on the city of Memphis and more. She is joined by host Eric Barnes and Bill Dries, senior reporter for the Memphis Daily News. 

Jennifer Chandler

Looking to score a touchdown at your Super Bowl party?

It's all about the snacks.

While nachos and sliders are popular game-day favorites, when it comes to quarterbacking the buffet, there's one dish on the must-have list: hot wings.


WKNO-TV

This week on WKNO's Behind the Headlines, Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell and Shelby County Health Department Director Dr. Alisa Haushalter discuss the county's efforts to deal with the opioid crisis.

The Kitchen Community

Did you know that a vegetable garden could impact a child in a positive way?


WKNO-TV

It's budget season and officials are discussing how the money will be spent. On WKNO's Behind the Headlines, Shelby County Commission Chair Heidi Shafer and Memphis City Council Chair Berlin Boyd talk about the budget and more this week. 

Women's March Anniversary Refreshes Activist Spirit

Jan 21, 2018
Savannah Smith, WKNO-FM

  More than 1,000 people gathered Saturday morning in Midtown Memphis for the second annual Women’s March, one of the many events held across the country last weekend.

 

Unlike last year’s march down Main Street, this year’s rally was held inside First Congregational Church.

During the event, activists and community leaders gave speeches stressing the importance of individuals voting and staying active in politics.

Kathy Story, who took part last year, spoke about the ever-changing political climate.

A local author has a new cookbook out with a twist like no other!


Pages

A group of teenagers who say they are desperate for some action on gun control staged a silent "lie-in" outside the White House Monday, in the wake of the deadly Florida school shooting last week.

In more than three decades of work, Doug Jones has carved out a niche in the acting world by playing strange and otherworldly creatures. He was a demonic superhero in Hellboy and a monster with an appetite for children in Pan's Labyrinth.

But there was one storyline that proved elusive: Jones says, "I never saw romantic leading male [stories] coming with any creature roles."

Fifty years ago Monday, when Fred Rogers showed up on national public television as the host of what then was a brand new children's show called Mister Rogers' Neighborhood, TV was a lot different. PBS wasn't even a network then — not by that name, anyway — and aside from CBS, NBC and ABC, there were only a few independent local channels to watch, if that.

We expected the cold. It was, after all, the Winter Olympics.

But the wind is what has made an impression on many of us visiting Pyeongchang. It's even caused competition schedules to be rewritten.

For a string of days last week, the wind blew steady at 15 to 20 mph, with gusts of 45 mph. Concession stands and security scanners were toppled; temporary tents were blown away.

On the worst day, it looked as if a massive dust storm had descended. Three days later, we were still shaking sand out of our boots.

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TENNESSEE NEWS

Despite Calls From Students, Sewanee Declines To Rescind Honorary Degree For Charlie Rose

Sewanee, a liberal arts university in Middle Tennessee, has decided it will not revoke an honorary degree it awarded to Charlie Rose in 2016. The veteran news anchor was accused by several women late last year of making unwanted sexual advances in the workplace, andsome students at Sewanee: The University of the South had wanted its governing board to take action.

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ARKANSAS NEWS

Women In Arkansas Media Speak Up With #MoreThanABabe

Meteorologist Natalie Walter with KARK and KLRT talks with KUARs Jacob Kauffman about #morethanababe. This Thursday women in Arkansas's media world launched the #morethanababe hashtag in response to a local radio show's Babe Bracket that ranks TV journalists based on looks. Governor Asa Hutchinson previously went on program and said "everybody enjoys it” but has since released a statement saying he was not defending the gimmick. Multiple women in the media have tweeted this morning objecting...

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