A Connection Between Climate Change And Mental Health — Experts Say It's Time To Take Notice

A recent report from the American Psychiatric Association urges people to participate in policy and advocacy to combat climate change. And thats just one of the medical groups writing about the connection between adverse mental health effects and global disasters related to changing climate. Psychologist Judith Kuriansky  recently moderated a panel on climate change and mental health for the American Public Health Association . Shes traveled nationally and internationally to disaster sites to...

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WKNO Features

Voices of the South

Live music, a silent auction, and a petting-zoo musical are all on the line-up for the 13th Annual Memphis Children's Theatre Festival, hosted by Voices of the South.

The popular Memorial Day weekend event kicks off 6 p.m. Friday at Rhodes Collage and runs through Saturday afternoon. 

VOTS Jenny Madden and Alice Berry discuss this year's lineup with Kacky Walton.

 


WKNO-TV

It's the question that usually follows "Does Shelby County need universal pre-k?" 

How to pay for it.

The solution could require a combination of public and private dollars. This week on WKNO-TV's Behind the Headlines, the efforts to expand pre-k are discussed by some of the major proponents. Joining host Eric Barnes is Kathy Buckman Gibson with Seeding Success; Mike Carpenter, executive director for TQEE; and city councilman Kemp Conrad. They are joined by Bill Dries, senior reporter at the Memphis Daily News. 

Innovative gardens are flourishing in Memphis' historic Cooper Young neighborhood. Also growing: the number of people wanting to check them out. 

The 3rd Annual Cooper Young Garden Walk offers greenthumbs and garden geeks a chance to see what's sproutin' on Saturday and Sunday (May 19 & 20). 

A total of 89 gardens—more than double the amount from the first year—are open for perusal. This year's theme is native plants in an urban setting. 

 

Once more jumping from the television screen to the pages, WKNO-TV's Behind the Headlines host Eric Barnes has come out with another novel The City Where We Once Lived. The book depicts an abandoned city where people choose to live. It's divided by the north and south end; as the novel unfolds readers learn the history of the city as well as the complicated, dark past of the characters. A prequel, Above the Ether, is set to be released in March 2019.

 

Melissa Cookston

With the Memphis in May World Championship Barbecue Cooking Contest this weekend, we have to talk about barbecue!


WKNO-TV

This week on WKNO-FM's Behind the Headlines, Memphis journalists take a look at the results of the recent primaries and what they have in store for the August election. Also on the roundtable discussion: Graceland's plan for expansion and its ongoing legal disputes with the city and the Grizzlies. Finally, an update on the city council. Host Eric Barnes is joined by Ryan Poe of the Commercial Appeal, Toby Sells of the Memphis Flyer, Karanja Ajanaku of the New Tri-State Defender and Bill Dries of the Memphis Daily News

The arts are as essential as English and math, or so the statistics say. Here's one: students in the arts are four times more likely to earn academic honors.

That's why this Saturday (May 12), Shelby County Schools is highlighting over 900 student performers and nearly a thousand pieces of student artwork from more than 150 different Schools.  

Joel Hurd WKNO-FM

Last week's overflow crowd at the Stax Museum of American Soul Music had good reason to be excited. On the 15th Anniversary of the museum's opening, Executive Director Jeff Kollath entered stage left wearing white gloves and carrying a baritone saxophone. He then placed it on a stand in the center of the stage. A key instrument of the Stax sound was home.


Andrea LeTard

Some moms are great cooks and others are great at ordering take-out.


WKNO-TV

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland visits WKNO-TV's Behind the Headlines this week to look ahead at some of the issues facing the city in the future. Deannexation could have an impact on the city's tax base and income, but could also help cut the city's expenses. Also, the mayor talks about the tax incentives called PILOTs (Payment In Lieu of Taxes), seen as a way to attract new business to Memphis. Host Eric Barnes is joined by Bill Dries of the Memphis Daily News.

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Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Every evening after dinner, Herman Agbavor and his 5-year-old son Herbert have a ritual. Little Herbert climbs into his dad's lap, unzips his book bag and they go over his kindergarten homework.

The two of them have been doing some variation of this homework routine since Herbert was 1. That's when Agbavor first enrolled the boy in preschool.

They live in a working-class neighborhood of Ghana's capital city Accra — in a cement block apartment in a multifamily house that's got a television and lots of books but no indoor plumbing.

More News

TENNESSEE NEWS

Who Gets Credit For Tennessee's Huge Drop In Teen Pregnancy?

Hear the radio version of this story No one's sure exactly why Tennessee's rate of teen pregnancy took a nosedive in the most recent figures, but their best guess: more kids are abstaining from sex. Tennessee's teen pregnancy rate has dropped for the last two decades as the national figure has also declined.

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ARKANSAS NEWS

Arkansas Supreme Court Hears Challenge To Medical Marijuana Ruling

Hear the report by KUARs Michael Hibblen. The Arkansas Supreme Court heard oral arguments Thursday in a challenge by the state to a circuit judge’s order that halted the issuing of medical marijuana cultivation licenses. It was also revealed that investigators are looking into allegations that a bribe was offered by one company to a member of the Medical Marijuana Commission. Pulaski County Circuit Judge Wendell Griffen ruled in March that the process for how the commission decided which...

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