Trump Says Transgender People Can't Serve In Military

Updated at 4:30 p.m. ET President Trump has announced that the government will not allow transgender people to serve in the U.S. military, a year after the Pentagon lifted its ban on transgender service members. In a series of tweets on Wednesday morning, he wrote: "After consultation with my Generals and military experts, please be advised that the United States Government will not accept or allow ... Transgender individuals to serve in any capacity in the U.S. Military. Our military must be...

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WKNO Features

Christopher Blank/WKNO-FM

University of Memphis law professor Daniel Schaffzin runs a legal clinic that assigns students environmental court cases on behalf of the City of Memphis. It's much needed help for the city's fight against rampant blight. One student, Jordan Emily, took on a large apartment complex abandoned by an out-of-state owner. The case is one example of the legal challenges facing a city swamped with more than 800 similar cases.

Jessica Orians

One new marker commemorates a 100-year-old lynching. Meanwhile, Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland addresses the future of Confederate Monuments.

 


Vino al Fresco

May 23, 2017

Wondering what to drink at your Memorial Day picnic this weekend?


Justin Willingham / WKNO-FM

Great communicators speak in the simplest terms possible. Understanding is a product of clarity, and clarity comes from simplicity and the elimination of jargon.


Melonee Gaines

The Boys and Girls Club of Greater Memphis is proposing an expansion into under-utilized Shelby County Schools.  

The targeted schools - Dunbar Elementary, Riverview School, and Craigmont High School - would help the organization grow beyond their current seven sites and bolster economically depressed communities.

As education reform takes shape in Memphis, the organization envisions these schools as multipurpose, yearlong facilities.

When tourists visit Memphis, they might spend the day soaking in the music history. But when musicians make "the pilgrimage" to a famed recording studio, it's about finding the groove. Just ask U.K. recording artist Emily Barker.


Langdon Clay

Since the Memphis in May World Championship Barbecue Cooking Contest is this week, I thought it the perfect time to talk about Memphis BBQ’s favorite side  - Cole Slaw!


Alex Kich / fotolia.com

Newsweek Magazine reported that 40 percent of apparel bought online is returned. And 60 percent of returns are size problems. What's the deal with varying companies using different measurements for "the same size?" 


Jennifer Chandler

Wow your mom this weekend by making her Crème Brulee for a Mother’s Day treat!


Christopher Blank/WKNO-FM

A photo and film exhibit at Crosstown Arts reflects on last January's Women's March on Washington D.C. Filmmakers Sara Kaye Larson and Joann Self Selvidge, along with Yalonda M. James, a photojournalist for the Commercial Appeal, wanted to put the viewer right in the middle of a march, and by extension, a movement.


Pages

In the seven years since the Affordable Care Act was passed, CEOs of U.S. health care companies have made a lot of money.

Their compensation far outstrips the wage growth of nearly all Americans, according to reporter Bob Herman, who published an analysis this week of "the sky-high pay of health care CEOs" for the online news site, Axios.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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TENNESSEE NEWS

Graduate Of First Integrated Class In The South Talks Desegregation With Tennessee Teachers

Hear the radio version of this story. Sixty years ago, Bobby Cain became the first African-American man to graduate from an integrated high school in the South. Just one year prior, he and 11 other black students had enrolled at Clinton High School in East Tennessee. They became known as the Clinton 12.

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ARKANSAS NEWS

Senators From Arkansas Vote In Favor Of Beginning Debate On Healthcare

Senators John Boozmanand Tom Cotton of Arkansas joined their Republican colleagues in voting to begin debate on repealing and possibly replacing the Affordable Care Act. In written statements released after the vote Tuesday afternoon, both were cautious in their support with so much unknown about what will be presented. Boozman said it was "just the first step," while Cotton said he will be "carefully monitoring any legislative changes that are proposed." Two other Republicans in the Senate...

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