Business
5:51 am
Mon April 21, 2014

Honda Introduces Asimo To North America

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 6:53 am

Asimo is Honda's latest humanoid robot. This one, the third version, is more life-like than previous models.

NPR Story
4:03 am
Mon April 21, 2014

Powdered Alcohol Approved By The Feds

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 6:53 am

Palchohol is powdered alcohol — just mix with water to create an instant cocktail. The creators of Palcohol pitched their idea as a solution to the soaring price of alcohol.

NPR Story
4:03 am
Mon April 21, 2014

Dominated By 1 Point Of View, Late-Night TV Needs New Voices

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 6:08 am

On Tuesday, Stephen Colbert stops by the CBS Late Show to greet the man he'll replace next year, David Letterman. It also spotlights a reality in late-night TV --almost every host is a white man.

NPR Story
4:03 am
Mon April 21, 2014

'Transcendence': Latest Sci-Fi Movie About Artificial Intelligence

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 7:25 am

Transcendence is an ambitious and provocative film about the perils and pleasures of artificial intelligence that is intriguingly balanced between being a warning and a celebration.

NPR Story
4:03 am
Mon April 21, 2014

Boxer Rubin 'Hurricane' Carter Dies At 76

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 6:08 am

The former fierce middleweight prizefighter became an international symbol after he was convicted twice for a 1966 triple murder. Carter's conviction was eventually overturned by a federal judge.

Code Switch
4:03 am
Mon April 21, 2014

In Asian-Majority District, House Race Divides Calif. Voters

Rep. Mike Honda (left) walks down the House steps with Rep. Raul Ruiz after a vote at the Capitol on March 20, 2013.
Bill Clark CQ-Roll Call

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 6:53 am

The U.S. mainland's only Asian-majority congressional district sits in California's Silicon Valley, where two Indian-American candidates are trying to oust Japanese-American Congressman Mike Honda.

All Tech Considered
2:44 am
Mon April 21, 2014

Who Should Pay To Keep The Internet's Locks Secure?

A lock icon signifies an encrypted Internet connection. But thanks to a recently discovered (and now fixed) bug, it's been bleeding out information for a few years.
Mal Langsdon Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 6:53 am

The encryption code unlocked by the Heartbleed bug last week provided vital security for some of the most widely used websites on the Internet. Fortune 1000 companies rely on the open source code for their core business. But it turns out no one is paying for it.

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Your Money
2:42 am
Mon April 21, 2014

How Do Companies Boost 401(k) Enrollment? Make It Automatic

iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 6:53 am

More Americans are saving for retirement through their employers' 401(k) programs. That's because in recent years they've been given a strong nudge — more companies are automatically enrolling workers in retirement savings programs.

Some firms are also automatically increasing the amount employees contribute. That's just as important, experts say.

And all this makes a big difference: Without it, millions of Americans don't save at all.

Making Time For Retirement Planning

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Shots - Health News
2:41 am
Mon April 21, 2014

For The Children's Sake, Put Down That Smartphone

Katherine Streeter for NPR

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 8:43 am

It's not just kids who are overdoing screen time. Parents are often just as guilty of spending too much time checking smartphones and e-mail — and the consequences for their children can be troubling.

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Shots - Health News
2:40 am
Mon April 21, 2014

Scribes Are Back, Helping Doctors Tackle Electronic Medical Records

Medical scribe Connie Gayton keeps the electronic records, allowing orthopedic surgeon Devesh Ramnath to focus on his patients.
Brandon Thibodeaux for NPR

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 8:43 am

Like many other doctors across the country, Dr. Devesh Ramnath, a Dallas orthopedic surgeon, recently made the switch from paper to electronic medical records. This meant he no longer had to just take notes when he was examining a patient — he also had to put those notes into the computer as a permanent record.

"I was really focused on just trying to get the information in, and not really focusing on the patient anymore," Ramnath says.

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