Meribah Knight

Meribah Knight is a journalist who recently relocated to Nashville from Chicago, where she covered business, the economy, housing, crime and transportation.

Most recently she was a staff reporter with Crain’s Chicago Business covering manufacturing in the Rust Belt, aviation and transportation. Prior to Crain’s she was a staff reporter with the Chicago News Cooperative, producing the Chicago section of The New York Times. There she covered a wide range of topics from arts & culture to education to poverty. She was an adjunct lecturer at Northwestern University’s Medill School of Journalism. 

Her writing has appeared The New York TimesThe New YorkerO, The Oprah MagazineUtne Reader, American Craft, Chicago Magazine, Crain’s Chicago Business and The Chicago Reader. Her radio and multimedia work has been featured on WBEZ, The PBS News Hour and Chicago Public Television. 

A native of Cambridge, Mass., Meribah has a Masters of Journalism from Northwestern University and a BA from New York University. She lives in Donelson with her husband, a photojournalist with the Tennessean, and their four cats. 

Nashville Mayor Megan Barry could face multiple investigations in the wake of an extramarital affair she had with the head of her security detail. What’s being called into question is the use of taxpayer money for trips she took with her former bodyguard as well as thousands of dollars in overtime pay he received.

Home prices in Nashville may be leveling out in 2018. A forecast by Realtor.com says that's because the number of homes for sale in the area is increasing.

A year ago this week, massive wildfires swept through the Smoky Mountains in East Tennessee. In the resort towns of Gatlinburg and Pigeon Forge, thousands of homes and cabins were lost.

The state’s top law enforcement agency promised a complete and thorough investigation into the fatal shooting of a Nashville man by a city police officer. But a WPLN examination of a 600-page case file casts doubt on the thoroughness of the probe, and it reveals discrepancies between how the case was investigated and how officials have been describing their work for months.

What will be the tallest residential high-rise in Nashville is now as tall as it’s going to get. The building, called the 505, is forty-five stories and changes the skyline of Music City.

Rutherford County is going to have to stop its policy of arresting and detaining children accused of minor crimes, at least for the time being. A federal judge has granted a preliminary injunction in favor of a lawsuit that claims the county has spent years unlawfully detaining juveniles.   

South Nashville's Glencliff United Methodist Church has cleared all the bureaucratic hurdles to build a cluster of tiny homes for the homeless on its property. The only problem is the neighborhood hates the idea. They’ve hurled insults, fumed on Facebook and threatened to picket church services.

The Nashville police department is getting rid of a 31-year-old, racially charged textbook that is issued to every academy recruit.

The decision comes after WPLN pressed the police department on its use of Tactical Edge, a book covering high risk patrol, in a story that aired Monday.

On the first day of training, every new recruit in the Nashville Police Academy is issued a stack of reading materials. Right on the top is Tactical Edge, a textbook dedicated to high risk patrol.

The dedication page reads: “For those officers who want to win.” The book, written by former journalist Charles Remsberg, was published in 1986. With gritty black and white photographs and tabloid-esque writing, it depicts a world of constant and increased threat. And it prescribes an aggressive approach to policing at a time when Nashville's department, and many around the country, are trying to move the other way.

On a recent Sunday, Pastor Morris Tipton greets his congregation with sturdy handshakes and big hugs. Tipton is the pastor at First Baptist Church East Nashville, a church nearly as old as the city itself.

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