Morning Edition on WKNO

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  • Local Host Rob Grayson

Morning Edition is your perfect morning companion: gentle, but straightforward, news and information, with local weather and traffic reports.

Feist: A Pop Star With A Punk-Rock Past

Sep 29, 2011

It's been four years since Leslie Feist released "1234," the career-making single that also became a testament to the power of a still-nascent YouTube. Feist, who performs under her last name, took some time off from performing after that surge in popularity. But she'll return next week with Metals, her first new album since 2007.

Idris Elba tells Linda Wertheimer on Wednesday's Morning Edition that he didn't come to the United States from the UK to play "black roles," but merely "roles." And he has: roles like Stringer Bell on HBO's dark drug epic The Wire and John Luther, the central character of Luther, a drama series that returns for a second season tonight on BBC America.

For A Crocodile, He's Awfully Orange

Sep 28, 2011

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, host: Good morning. I'm David Greene.

The Land of 10,000 Lakes is being rebranded. Fast Company reports Nicole Meyer missed Minnesota's lakes when she moved away to Phoenix. She's keeping her Midwest roots in mind by designing logos for EACH Minnesota lake. She creates one per day, meaning she will finish in 27 years.

The Dream Of Europe And The Bailout Of Greece

Sep 27, 2011

"We need Greece," Maurice Minot, a Frankfurt taxi driver, told me, swerving in excitement. "We need Spain, we need Italy. It's the dream for Europeans, for more than a hundred years."

For Minot, as for many Germans on both sides of the debate, the question of bailouts goes beyond narrow self interest. It gets at what it means to be German, and what it means to be European.

Klaus Frankenberger, an editor at the newspaper Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, points to the painful labor reforms Germany went through a few years ago.

We're All Just 'Guys'

Sep 27, 2011

As best as I know, I own the distinction of being the first human being to call our national attention to a linguistic phenomenon.

This was back in 1972, in an article in Sports Illustrated about Robyn Smith, who was then the best female jockey in the land. Smith referred to married couples as "you guys." I was so bemused that someone might actually refer to a woman as a guy that I felt obliged to mention it in the piece.

A billboard went up near the Green Bay Packers' stadium showing the grim reaper decked out in a cheesehead hat. A physicians group promoting vegan diets says its new ad simply points out that cheese can be unhealthy. Green Bay's mayor says this is silly. As he put it, "We love our cheeseheads and we love our cheese."

Until Monday, only people who had been dead for at least five years could appear on U.S. postage stamps. It was, in that way, a little like becoming a saint. But now the Postal Service is inviting suggestions for living people who deserve to be on a stamp. People can submit their ideas through Facebook and Twitter — and, of course, by mail.It's Morning Edition.

Twenty-five years after its initial publication, Nicholas Pileggi's Wiseguy remains one of the signal narratives about life in the Mafia. Adapted by Pileggi and director Martin Scorsese into the 1990 film GoodFellas, it follows the rise and fall of true-life Brooklyn gangster Henry Hill — "a little cog" in the Lucchese crime family who turned FBI informant after a drug arrest.

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