Advertising

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It’s amazing how little substance there is in most brand advertising today. The vast majority of product campaigns all seem to be pretty photography and fluff.

Brand awareness obviously is the objective. But in most campaigns you have to ask the question, “awareness of what?”

Barbasol, a shaving product that came out almost a hundred years ago, aired a campaign this year that showed some substance.

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We spend our lives in a branded environment. We buy branded products and services. We work for companies that are trying to build their brands. Some of us work in a brand-building role.

At the very least, we spend our money with a keen awareness of brands.

Why? What is it about a brand that influences us so? What makes a brand worth billions? What makes one bar of soap worth twice as much as another?

The brand.

What is a brand, anyway? One word: trust. The definition of a brand is trust.

The effects of the Internet continue to astound me. As simple an asset as a killer web site name – and knowing what to do with it - can turn a nothing business into eight-figures in no time.

Serial entrepreneur Jesse Stein bought the name SportsMemorabilia-dot-com in 2006 for twelve-thousand-five-hundred dollars. At the time, the site was doing business of a few hundred dollars a month.

archer>malmo

True marketing is a process of maximizing a company’s assets. It begins with identifying the company’s assets, and that’s not always as obvious as you might think.

The genius chief marketing officer at Delta Airlines was the first to identify Delta’s customers as an asset two years ago. The result included new sales opportunities that have accounted for over $1.5 billion in new revenue.

You can go through a similar marketing process in your own behalf, and you begin the very same way.

As adults, we realize how different our world is today from that of our parents. And theirs from their parents. And there’s nothing like generational differences to kill off brands that don’t stay relevant with each new generation.

A critical aspect of marketing is making sure that a brand stays relevant to each new generation.

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Almost nothing is a bigger gamble in advertising than humor. What you think is funny, your husband or wife doesn’t. Or thinks is corny. Or just doesn’t get it. 

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The "Avis: We-Try-Harder" campaign has identified the brand for fifty years in a category with no other indelible advertising identity. 

My generation grew up with a steady advertising diet of “Ivory Soap. Ninety-nine-and-one-hundredths-percent pure. And it floats.” 

auremar / fotolia.com

The safety razor was invented in 1901. About a hundred years later, Gillette owned an eighty percent share of the safety razor blade market, worth about a billion dollars a year.

Marketing is my beat. Not education.

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